Acute necrotizing pancreatitis

Acute necrotising pancreatitis masquerading as psoas abscess: A report of two cases

Published on: 15th July, 2020

Acute pancreatitis is commonly diagnosed clinically, with its classical presentation of upper abdominal pain, backed by raised serum levels of enzymes amylase and lipase. However, unusual presentation of this common surgical emergency as a psoas abscess is a rare finding which can lead to missed diagnosis with a fatal outcome. We present here two such cases of acute necrotising pancreatitis masquerading as psoas abscess, with no classical clinical symptoms and only mildly raised levels of serum amylase and lipase. The region of pancreas involved by necrosis influenced the site of presentation of the psoas abscess. In the first case, acute necrotising pancreatitis involving head and neck of pancreas presented as psoas abscess presenting in the right lumbar region, while the left side collection due to pancreatitis involving body and tail of pancreas manifested as an abscess in left flank. While evaluating the aetiology of a psoas abscess, a differential diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis should be kept as a possibility.
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Fatal acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 15 years old boy, is it multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children associated with COVID-19; MIS-C?

Published on: 13th January, 2022

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9396181492

Acute pancreatitis in childhood is not common and viral and bacterial infections, bile duct diseases, medications, systemic diseases, trauma, metabolic diseases, and hyperlipidemia are among the most common causes in them. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is even rarer. The clinical presentation of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children associated with COVID-19 (MIS-C) includes fever, severe illness, and the involvement of two or more organ systems, in combination with laboratory evidence of inflammation and with or without laboratory or epidemiologic evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection. We present a case of a 15 years old boy with fatal acute necrotizing pancreatitis that fulfilled MIS-C definition based on RCPCH (Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health) and CPSP (Canadian Pediatric Surveillance Program) criteria.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat