Adenocarcinoma of the lung

Non-smoking woman with adenocarcinoma of the lung, IV stage with ROS1 mutation and acquired thrombophilia

Published on: 4th August, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9272371189

Despite the fact, that lung cancer is more common among older smoking men, however it may also develop among young women without a smoking anamnesis. We report here a history of a non-smoking woman, 40 years old, with a diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma at IV stage. Despite the fact, the woman received three lines of palliative chemotherapy, the disease progressed. After the sample of the tumor was tested by genetic approach, ROS1 mutation was detected, and the patient was treated with a ROS1 inhibitor, Crizotinib. Sharp improvement was observed already after the first week of treatment. After one-month adenocarcinoma shrink, and specific supraclavicular lymph nodes disappeared. Unfortunately, due to problems with financing the treatment was stopped, after what the disease began to progress rapidly, and the patient died after a month due to brain metastasis. This case is noteworthy also because the patient was first diagnosed a thrombophilia with thrombi present in deep calf veins, left heart ventricle and lungs Adenocarcinoma was discovered occasionally when during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery biopsy specimen was taken from suspicious mass in the lower lobe of the right lung. This story reminds us that lung carcinoma may start with a paraneoplastic syndrome, like thrombophilia as in this case and finding of adenocarcinoma of the lung in young, non-smoking persons is indicative for possible ROS1 gene mutation. In such cases early treatment with ROS1 protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors should be started as soon as possible.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Foley catheter balloon tamponade as a method of controlling iatrogenic pulmonary artery bleeding in redo thoracic surgery

Published on: 20th November, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9269426092

Background: Pulmonary artery bleeding secondary to iatrogenic injury is a troublesome intraoperative complication. The likelihood of encountering this complication is significantly higher in redo surgery for a number of reasons, including distortion of anatomical structures, adhesions and loss of tissue planes. Significant blood loss, although rare, remains a concern, and can occasionally be life-threatening. When significant bleeding from the pulmonary artery occurs, it can be a challenging situation to manage. Case Report: A 65 year old female was undergoing redo thoracic surgery in the setting of a completion lobectomy for biopsy-proven primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. Iatrogenic injury to the pulmonary artery resulted in significant bleeding that could not be managed by gaining proximal control due to dense adhesions. The novel decision to utilize a Foley catheter for balloon tamponade was taken, in order to provide sufficient haemostasis for definitive surgical repair of the defect to be undertaken Conclusion: The increased technical difficulties of redo thoracic surgery are well recognised. We describe the first case of Foley catheter balloon tamponade being utilized in the context of iatrogenic pulmonary artery bleeding during thoracic surgery.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Acrometastasis as first sign of adenocarcinoma of the lung

Published on: 26th February, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8559313349

Lung cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Metastasis can be seen in many organs in advanced-stage disease. Acral metastasis rate in cancer is quite low. However, because of the direct opening of the arterial circulation, the risk of acral metastasis stem from lung cancer is higher than any other cancers. Although the mechanism is not known exactly, acral metastases occur in dominant extremities. Here, we present a case with lung adenocarcinoma metastasis of the left hand in the second phalanx. We presented this case which is rarely seen in the literature to emphasize acral metastases.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat