Alcoholic steatohepatitis

Overview of glycemic control among admitted patients with diabetes in Tripoli University Hospital

Published on: 18th February, 2022

Aim: To examine the relationship between the levels of HbA1c and hospital admission rates.Methods: We recorded HbA1c levels of all diabetic patients in Tripoli University Hospital over one year.Results: The mean HbA1c was 8.03%, with no difference between males and females. Over half of patients (56.5%) were admitted through their diabetes was well-controlled. Over half of the patients with type 1 diabetes (57/102, 55.9%) had a high HbA1c at admission compared to 42.1% of patients with type 2, who were mainly admitted with HbA1c level within the acceptable range set for this study. The HbA1c level was positively and significantly correlated with the length of hospital stay (R = 0.93, p = 0.000), and was significantly associated with hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, coronary artery disease, limb ischemia, cataract, osteomyelitis, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.Conclusion: HbA1c is correlated significantly with hospitalization in type 1 diabetes but not in type 2.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

A case of coexistent acute severe alcoholic and Q fever hepatitis: The useful contribution of repeated liver biopsies

Published on: 23rd September, 2022

Acute Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infection due to C. burnetii that may be associated with hepatitis. Nonspecific clinical and biological manifestations may accompany liver involvement, including hepatomegaly and elevated liver biological tests. However, the presence of jaundice is rare. Therefore, making a diagnosis of Q fever hepatitis may be difficult in an afebrile patient with jaundice of recent onset, altered liver function tests, excessive alcohol intake and no reported contact with animals. We report here the diagnostic work-up and complex clinical management of a patient presenting with acute hepatitis resulting from both C. burnetii infection and severe alcoholic steatohepatitis. Positive serology together with a detailed examination of the liver biopsy was able to reveal the coexistence of both Q fever hepatitis with typical fibrin-ring granulomas as well as florid lesions of alcoholic steatohepatitis. A combination of antibiotics, hydroxychloroquine and steroids, guided by the helpful description of changes in histological alterations on repeated liver biopsies during the course of the disease contributed to the slow but favorable outcome.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat