Anal cancer

Anal cytology in immunocompetent patients with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN II and CIN III)

Published on: 13th February, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8550959427

Introduction: Anal cancer is directly related to the presence of high-grade HPV. Immunocompromised patients have defined conducts, something which is not observed in immunocompetent patients. Objective: To study the anal cytology of patients with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (CINII and III) in order to propose a protocol to be followed by the Oncology Gynaecology Service at the Samuel Libânio Clinical Hospital (HCSL). Methods: Clinical, prospective, transversal and single-centered study. Sampling was by convenience within one year. A total of 150 patients were studied. Out of these, 76 were patients with high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesions diagnosed through histopathological examination of the uterine cervix (Study Group) and 74 without high-grade intraepithelial lesions and with cervical cytology negative for neoplasia (Control Group). The following variables were analyzed: age, sexarc, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, STD history (not HPV), menopause, Hormone Replacement Therapy, anal sex practice, parity, number of sexual partners and contraceptive use. Results: There was no significant difference between the number of cases in altered anal cancer oncology in the study group, in comparison with the control group. Conclusion: There were changes in the anal cytology of the study group and these should be evaluated due to the risk of dealing with pre-neoplastic anal lesion. Clinical Trials: NCT03241680.
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Anal cancer - impact of interstitial brachytherapy

Published on: 1st February, 2021

We evaluated a total of 115 patients diagnosed with anal cancer, who were treated at our clinic from 1995 to 2012. Their average age was 61 years, most often were diagnosed in stages II and III, in most cases it was a squamous cell carcinoma located in the anal canal. The mean follow-up was 83 months (minimum 1 month and maximum 240 months). We combined external radiotherapy with boost of brachytherapy or boost of external radiotherapy and possibly a combination of both boosts. Half of the patients received concomitant chemotherapy. We specifically evaluated local tumor regression, overall survival and the impact to therapeutic effect of the chosen irradiation technique. Complete regression was achieved in 92 patients, partial regression in 21 patients. Overall survival, regardless of stage, was 80% 3-year, 74% 5-year and 67% 10-year. The age of patients, the size of their own primary tumor and the therapeutic method used had a statistically significant effect on survival - especially the importance of brachytherapy was irreplaceable.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat