Arachnoid cyst

Occipital lobe ependymal cyst with unusual presentation

Published on: 19th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8286553600

Intraparenchymal cysts without communication to the ventricles or the subarachnoid space are named ependymal or epithelial cysts. The estimated ratio of their incidence compared with arachnoid cysts is 1:10. Neurologic deficit can occur when the cyst exerts mass effect on its surroundings. We report a case of cerebral ependymal cyst in a 75-year-old lady who presented with history of headache, vomiting and left incomplete homonymous hemianopsia. Neuroimaging studies showed a large right occipital cyst. She underwent the neurosurgical procedure of marsupialization. Histologic findings and the immunophenotype was consistent with a diagnosis of ependymal cyst. The patient made an excellent recovery after the procedure.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Chronic subdural haematoma associated with arachnoid cyst of the middle fossa in a soccer player: Case report and review of the literature

Published on: 16th May, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8628644362

Introduction: Arachnoid cyst (AC) is a congenital, benign, extra-axial lesion often found incidentally on intracranial imaging and makes up almost 1% of all intracranial masses. It arises from the splitting of arachnoid membranes with components similar to the cerebrospinal fluid. It’s reported that AC can be complicated by chronic subdural haematoma in athletes with repeated head injuries. Case report: we describe a case of a soccer player with an AC that underwent surgery for a chronic subdural haematoma with full recovery. Material and method: From a PubMed research, we found 14 relevant studies reporting a total of 15 patients who met the inclusion criteria: playing soccer, subdural hematoma and arachnoid cyst. Results: Patients underwent different surgical treatment. In the case of hygroma with no midline shift, a conservative treatment was performed. In all cases the reported follow up was a full recovery. Discussion: Soccer is not usually considered a contact sport related to a high risk of head trauma or shaking head. From our review we can postulate that a soccer player with AC has an augmented risk to have a subdural haemorrhage, more rarely intracerebral haemorrhage. Conclusion: ACs are common meningeal abnormalities. They may bleed after minor head trauma, although it is rare. Asymptomatic patients with known AC should be monitored by a neurosurgeon and decision to engage this patient in soccer sport participation is still controversial.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat