Chronic lymphoid leukemia

Chemotherapy Exposure and outcomes of Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia Patients

Published on: 26th June, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317598103

This study describes chemotherapy exposure, healthcare utilization, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) among patients diagnosed with chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL). Newly diagnosed CLL patients who received chemotherapy were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry between 1998-2011, linked on a patient-level to the PHARMO Database Network including data on in- and out-patient drug dispensings, hospitalizations and clinical laboratory measurements. Chemotherapy was classified in regimens of use based on chemotherapy combinations. OS and PFS were determined after diagnosis and after chemotherapy. Healthcare utilization was assessed in the year before diagnosis and in the year after chemotherapy. In total, 125 CLL patients received chemotherapy: 52 patients (42%) started chemotherapy within 6 months and 73 patients (58%) started chemotherapy ≥6 months after diagnosis. Mean (±SD) age was 67(±10) years and 68% was male. About 50% had one treatment line and about 25% two lines of treatment. Chlorambucil was the most common type of first line chemotherapy. Prior diagnosis, 44% were hospitalized for any cause and 94% had at least one drug dispensing. After chemotherapy, this was 43% and 98%, respectively. One-year survival rate after diagnosis was 94%. Median PFS after first treatment line was 17 months for patients starting within 6 months and 27 months for patients starting ≥6 months after diagnosis. In conclusion, most CLL patients receiving chemotherapy were treated with chlorambucil. One-year after initial diagnosis, 94% were still alive. Median PFS after first line chemotherapy ranged from 17 to 27 months, depending on the timing of chemotherapy.
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Results of chemotherapy in the treatment of chronic lymphoid leukemia in Black Africa: Experience of Côte d’Ivoire

Published on: 27th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8275582880

Background: The treatment of chronic lymphoid leukemia currently uses news drugs which are more expensive in our countries. Its why, the results of chemotherapy remains a challenge in our sector. Aims: To evaluate the place of polychemotherapy in the treatment of chronic lymphoid leukemia in black Africa. Methods: It was a prospective, descriptive, analytic and non-comparative study, concerning the records of patients with chronic lymphoid leukemia treated and followed at the department of clinical hematology in Abidjan. Results: We included 56 patients. The average age was 62 years with extremes of 38 and 84 years. The sex ratio was 0.8 in favor of female. The clinical signs noted a tumor syndrome among which splenomegaly, classified stage III (46, 43%) and adenopathy (64, 29%). Biologically, we observed a blood lymphocytosis (50%), an anemia (39.29%) and a thrombocytopenia (62.50%). The majority of patients were classified stage A of BINET (51.79%). The COP protocol (44.64%) and the monochemotherapy with chlorambucil (39.29%) were the most used. The therapeutic response of polychemotherapy was low (12.5%) compared to 35, 71% for monochemotherapy (p = 0.0001) with overall survival significantly better in monochemotherapy. The outcome of patients used polychemotherapy were more adverse that of patients used chlorambucil alone (p = 0,003). The overall probability of survival at 12 months was 90, 9% for patients who used monochemotherapy and 63, 4% for polychemotherapy. Conclusion: Polychemotherapy in chronic lymphoid leukemia of black African has an adverse therapeutic response hence the interest of using new therapeutic possibilities.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat