Hearing loss

Correlation between the presence of maternal gestational or pre-gestational pathologies and hearing impairment in the puerperal period

Published on: 22nd November, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8444358678

Objective: To evaluate whether the occurrence of maternal pathologies, mainly Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertensive Syndromes in the gestational or pre-gestational period may be related to hearing impairment in postpartum women. Methods: Observational, prospective study including 361 puerperal women who had their deliveries at a reference University Hospital for pregnant women with clinical history of risk. Auditory evaluation was performed by Distortion Product Otoaccoustic Emissions (DPOAE) within 14 days after delivery. Measures of central tendency and absolute and relative frequencies were used to describe the sample and the chi-square test and binary logistic regression to assess the correlation among variables. Significance higher than 95% was observed and the study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. Results: A total of 361 postpartum women were studied and 7.5% had hearing impairment. The frequency of gestational hypertension was 13.9%, that of gestational diabetes was 8.6% and that of pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus was 5.8%. The presence of hearing impairment was significantly correlated with the occurrence of pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus (OR: 4.5 - CI: 1.51-1.47), and maternal age greater than 29 years (OR: 3.72 - 1, 58-8.76); A correlation was also found between maternal age and the presence of pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus (OR: 3.84 - CI: 1.45-10.15). Conclusion: In the population of postpartum women evaluated, having Diabetes Mellitus prior to pregnancy and belonging to the age group older than 29 years increases the chance of having hearing loss.
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Tinnitus: Diagnosis and treatment options

Published on: 31st August, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317598632

Tinnitus-derived from the Latin “tinnire” meaning “to ring” is a perceived ringing, buzzing, or hissing in the ear(s) or around the head-which has multiple etiologies and is sometimes idiopathic. As of 2009 in the United States, approximately 50 million Americans were affected for six months or greater, while a United Kingdom study in 2000 reported a 10% prevalence in the adult population [1]. Tinnitus may vary widely with regard to pitch, loudness, description of sound, special localization, and temporal pattern [2]. Most often, tinnitus is associated with other aural symptoms, such as hearing loss and hyperacusis [3]. Tinnitus may result in sleep disturbances, work impairments, and distress. The severity varies within this cohort of chronic sufferers, with some unable to fulfill daily activities. Though tinnitus is more likely to affect adults and the incidence increases with age, children can experience tinnitus as well [4]. Males are more likely to suffer as are individuals who smoke [5]. 
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Burden of hearing loss in Subsaharan Africa: Snapshot from an ENT clinic in Nigeria

Published on: 31st December, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8512989994

Background: Disabling hearing loss is a prevalent public health issue, with significant impact on patients’ communication. The disability associated with hearing loss depends on the severity of the hearing loss. There are limited rehabilitative measures in resource challenged environment. This study assesses the incidence, the factors for hearing impairment and the management outcome. Methods: A descriptive three-year chart review of patients managed for hearing loss in a tertiary health center in a developing country. The data collected include demographic data, clinical presentation and risk factors for hearing loss, audiometric reports, rehabilitative measures and management outcome. Results: The patients with ear symptoms managed within the study period were 1350, of whom 498 (36.8%) had hearing loss of varying degrees. These included 145 (29.1%) males and 353 (70.9%) females with male to female ratio of 1:2.4. The age ranged from 8 to 80 years (median age of 35.7). Disabling hearing loss in the better-hearing ear occurred in 216 (43.4%) of cases. Increasing age and chronic supportive otitis media were associated with disabling hearing loss. The hearing thresholds improved with hearing aids and ear surgical procedures; nonetheless the patients’ rehabilitation was impaired by limited resources. Conclusion: There is poor rehabilitation of people with hearing loss, though management outcome is commendable in a few of them. Health education will reduce the risk factors for disabling hearing loss and improved rehabilitative measures are needed for these individuals.
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An exceptional case of bilateral vestibular areflexia complicating acute otitis media

Published on: 2nd July, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8627247898

Introduction: Bilateral vestibular areflexia is a rare pathological entity whose most frequent etiology is drug ototoxicity. We report an unusual case of bilateral vestibular areflexia complicating acute otitis media through which we raise the difficulties of diagnosis and therapeutic management of this pathology. Case Report: 57-year-old Tunisian patient who consults for a loss balance associated with earache and hearing loss. Initial clinical examination revealed bilateral acute otitis media with a right harmonious vestibular syndrome and normal neurological examination. The diagnosis of post-otitis labyrinthitis was retained. The patient was put on antibiotics and corticosteroids. The evolution was marked by the persistence of instability in darkness and oscillopsia; vestibular explorations concluded with bilateral vestibular areflexia. MRI concluded to posterior labyrinthitis and eliminated central neurological involvement. The patient was kept under betahistine. The tympanic cavity was drained by a tympanic aerator on both sides. Vestibular rehabilitation was started quickly. Gradual improvement was obtained of autonomy with persistent oscillopsia. Conclusion: Bilateral vestibular areflexia poses diagnostic problems based on anamnestic and clinical arguments and vestibular explorations. The therapeutic management is delicate, vestibular reeducation occupies a primordial place.
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Rehabilitation of hearing by cochlear implantation

Published on: 24th July, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8206594527

Background: Cochlear implants (CI) are nowadays a widely accepted treatment for sensorineural hearing loss SNHL. Aim: This study aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and the surgical approach and to evaluate the outcomes of our experience in cochlear implantation. Setting: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery of University Hospital Mohammed VI Marrakech Morocco. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on 113 patients with severe to profound hearing loss who underwent a cochlear implantation between 2007-2018. Results: There were 65 females and 48 males with severe to profound bilateral deafness, of whom 103 had prelingual deafness. The mean age of pediatric cochlear implantation was 5.25 years. Implantation was unilateral in all patients. The procedure was followed by regular adjustments and speech therapy. The evaluation was carried out by the same team each month during the first 6 months, then every 6 months. The average duration of follow-up was 37.54 months. All patients benefited from their implants with inter individual variability. The good results were correlated with early implantation, significant parental investment and a steady follow-up of speech therapy. Conclusion: Cochlear implantation has revolutionized the management of severe to profound deafness. It is a safe and effective technique when it is aimed at correctly selected populations.
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Changes in the frequency and intensity of Tinnitus using the Suppressive Noise Spectrum

Published on: 21st July, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7325433767

Objective:To report findings of improvement in patient tinnitus intensity and changes in frequency using a novel suppressive noise spectrum. Design: Single-subject; each subject served as his or her own control. Each patient received treatment, and changes were measured over time. Setting: Tertiary referral via university otolaryngology and hospital audiology as well as audiology clinics in the region. Patients: Fifteen tinnitus ears in 8 patients. Interventions: Therapeutic and rehabilitative. Main Outcome Measures:: Tinnitus frequency, tinnitus intensity, and tinnitus questionnaire. Results (Findings): After 3 months of exposure to the customized suppressive noise spectrum therapy, patients showed a shift in tinnitus frequency in addition to a significant decrease in tinnitus intensity from the pre-treatment to post-treatment condition (p<0.05). Typically, improvement was gradual based on comparing 3 sets of data collected at baseline, 1.5 months and 3 months. Conclusion: Using suppression in tinnitus is novel. Based on our findings, using a customized suppressive noise spectrum is effective in shifting the frequency, reducing the intensity of subjective tonal tinnitus, and improving the handicap based on THQ test. From this seminal report, factors related to maximizing its effectiveness (e.g., length of listening time, level of hearing loss, and application for alternative tinnitus types) may be considered for future research.
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Feasibility study on the evaluation of the effect of narrow-band CE-Chirp ASSR in the hearing field after hearing aid in hearing-impaired children

Published on: 12th July, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8200911498

Objective Study: Whether the narrow-band CE-Chirp ASSR test in the sound field is an objective evaluation method for the hearing aid compensation effect, and whether there is a difference in children with different hearing loss levels. Methods: 39 children (67 ears) wearing full digital hearing aids with good rehabilitation effect and ability to cooperate with behavioral audiometry were selected. The narrow-band CE-Chirp ASSR test group in the sound field was set as the experimental group, and the sound field behavioral audiometry after hearing aid was set as the control group. According to the degree of hearing loss, it was divided into moderate hearing loss group, severe hearing loss group and extremely severe hearing loss group. The difference between test results of experimental group and control group was compared. Results: There were no significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in the moderate hearing loss group and the extremely severe hearing loss group at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4kHz (P > 0.05). The results of the experimental group and the control group in the severe hearing loss group, There was no significant difference at 0.5, 1, 2kHz (P > 0.05), there was a significant difference at 4kHz (P < 0.05), and the mean difference was - 6.4dB HL. When the degree of hearing loss was not grouped, there was no significant difference between the experimental group and the control group at 0.5, 1, 2kHz (P > 0.05), 4kHz was significantly different (P < 0.05), and the mean difference was -3.2dB HL. Conclusion: It is clinically feasible to evaluate the hearing aid compensation effect of the narrow-band CE-Chirp ASSR in the hearing-impaired children. The grouping according to the degree of hearing loss can be more accurate in evaluating the hearing aid compensation effect. The narrow-band CE-Chirp in the sound field of children with moderate and very severe hearing loss ASSR results can be directly used to assess the hearing aid compensation effect, while children with severe hearing loss need to apply correction values at 4kHz.
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Prevalence of disabling hearing loss in the elderly

Published on: 19th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8286576506

Introduction: Disabling hearing loss refers to hearing thresholds superior than 40 dB in the better ear in the adults. The main cause of hearing loss in the elderly is the age-related hearing loss, also called presbycusis. This type of hearing impairment occurs as individuals grow older and is usually sensorineural hearing disorder greater for high-pitched sounds and affects both ears equally. It is estimated that 466 million people worldwide have disabling hearing loss, one third of which are over 65 years old. Objective: To analyze the prevalence of disabling hearing loss in the elderly of Juiz de Fora. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 122 patients. Pure tone audiometry was performed after meticulous physical examination of the external ear. Results: Out of 122 older adults, 85 (69,6%) presented disabling hearing loss. Conclusion: Hearing loss, specially disabling hearing loss, is a frequent condition in the elderly and has a big impact on their quality of life. For that it should be promptly diagnosed so treatment can be initiated.
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Auditory effects and consequences of noise pollution in humans: A scoping review

Published on: 9th November, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8796529862

Noise is widespread in everyday life and can cause both auditory and non-auditory health impacts. Noise-induced hearing loss remains highly prevalent in occupational settings and is now increasingly caused by exposure to social and environmental noise. Incidence of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has been observed to increase substantially in the recent years. Several advances have taken place in past few years for understanding the molecular basis of NIHL. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms implicated in noise-induced hair-cell and nerve damage has significantly increased. Research in the field of genetics is also advancing at a rapid speed, and several genes linked to NIHL have been discovered. This could help in developing preventive and treatment strategies. This review article focuses on the current research and future trends on auditory effects and consequences of noise pollution in humans, stressing the importance of adequate noise prevention and mitigation strategies as a public health measures.
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An incidental case report of Disc Battery Ingestion in a child with congenital hearing loss

Published on: 17th August, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9244771645

Foreign body ingestion in children is a serious problem encountered among children. Approximately 80% of cases of foreign body ingestions occur in children between the ages of six months and three years [1]. Button battery ingestion occurs at an estimate rate of ten in one million people per year, a small group of which are retained in the esophagus and later become complicated [2]. Button battery ingestion can lead to esophageal perforation and death within hours if not appropriately diagnosed [3].
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