Hematopoietic stem cell

The rising role of natural killer cells in patients with malignant hematological disorders and in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Published on: 1st October, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8333010200

Natural killer (NK) cells, the third population of lymphoid cells, comprise 5%-25% of peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes and represent the first line of defense against infections and tumors [1-7]. They can be derived from: bone marrow, PB, cryopreserved umbilical cord blood (UCB), human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and various cell lines such as NK-92 and KHYG-1 [1]. NK cells; which have been divided into cytotoxic, tolerant, and regulatory subsets; are classified into: (1) naïve CD56 bright CD 16 dim CD 3 dim cells, (2) mature CD56 dim CD16 bright CD3 dim cells, and (3) lymphoid tissue-resident CD69+/CXCR6+ NK cells [1,2,8-11]. Although NK cells have been traditionally considered as part of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown to exhibit many of the features associated with adaptive immunity [8,12]. The functions of NK cells which are influenced by several cytokines include: elimination of infected cells, destruction of cancer cells, reducing the incidence of graft versus host disease (GVHD) following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and regulation of pregnancy outcome [10,11,13]. 
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Natural killer cells in patients with hematologic malignancies, solid tumors and in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Published on: 9th December, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8440596237

Natural killer cells represent the first line of defense against infections and tumors and can be derived from various sources including: bone marrow, peripheral blood, specific types of human stem cells, and certain cell lines. The functions of natural killer cells are influenced by: several cytokines, activating and inhibitory receptors, as well as other immune cells such as dendritic cells and mesenchymal stem cells. Natural killer cells are attractive candidates for adoptive cellular therapy in patients with hematologic malignancies and solid tumors in addition to recipients of various forms of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as they enhance antitumor effects without causing graft versus host disease. Several clinical trials have shown safety and efficacy of natural killer cell products obtained from autologous as well as allogeneic sources and used in conjunction with cytotoxic chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies and novel agents. The following review, which includes extensive literature review on several aspects of natural killer cells, will give particular attention to: the rising role of natural killer cell therapies in patients with malignant hematological disorders, solid tumors and in recipients of stem cell therapies; preparation and manufacture of natural killer cell products; challenges facing the utilization of this form of cellular therapy including evolution of resistance; and maneuvers that can be employed to enhance the efficacy of natural killer cell therapies as well as suggested solutions to resolve the remaining challenges.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in systemic sclerosis patientss

Published on: 27th February, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8541470024

ystemic sclerosis (SScl) is an autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by fibrosis and microvascular injury of the affected organs. The hallmark of the disease is thickening and tightness of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue. SScl can affect virtually any organ systems, most importantly the skin, blood vessels, lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and the heart [1].
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Successful management of disseminated Fusarium infection in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

Published on: 17th September, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7877981809

Background: Invasive fungal infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients with hematologic malignancies and in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Case: We report a patient with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia who developed disseminated Fusarium infection during the neutropenic period following the salvage cycle of chemotherapy given at King Fahad specialist Hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. The invasive fungal infection was successfully managed with a combination of voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin-B. Discussion: Fusarium species can cause invasive infections that may become disseminated and life-threatening in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusion: Combined antifungal therapy and recovery of neutrophil count are essential to control invasive Fusarium infections
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Varicella zoster virus: The potentially useful virus

Published on: 5th July, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8174826530

Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a double-stranded DNA virus, is a highly contagious human neurotropic virus that belongs to the alpha group of herpes viruses [1-4]. Primary VZV infection (chickenpox) occurs in childhood then the virus becomes latent in the nerve ganglia [1,5-7]. Reactivation of the virus may occur decades later and cause herpes zoster (HZ) which is manifested by a typical painful skin eruption that has characteristic dermatomal distribution [1,5]. Reactivation of VZV is usually predisposed to: old age; comorbid medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive airway disease, and end-stage renal disease; and immunosuppression due to malignancy, autoimmune disorders, immunosuppressive therapies, trauma, cytotoxic chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and solid organ transplantation (SOT) [1,5-7].
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Achievement of cure following allogeneic HSCT with Flu-Bu regimen in a patient with severe mycosis fungoides and Sezary Syndrome

Published on: 6th December, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8465488841

Experience with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome (MF/SS) is limited to a small number of case reports and case series [1,2]. The advantage of allogeneic HSCT has been indicated in progressive disease in the review of CIBMTR study groups [3]. A consensus is still not available about the intensity and the content of the conditioning regimen due to the rarity of the disease and heterogeneous patient groups.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Serum MicroRNA-155 in Acute Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (aGVHD)

Published on: 16th August, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9059393117

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) is a curative treatment for many hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, about 30-50% of all recipients undergoing alloHSCT develop acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD), which is associated with high morbidity and mortality [1,2]. Treatment of aGVHD involves the use of immune suppressive drugs such as high dose of steroids that leads to further immunosuppression and risk for opportunistic infections. Often patients are refractory to steroids therapy making the prognosis dismal. Thus, it is critical to identify robust biomarkers to detect aGVHD before onset of clinical symptoms so that therapeutic strategies can be implemented that may result in better treatment responses and less toxicity. 
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Administration of G-CSF for PBSC collection may unmask pre-existing IgA-nephropathy: A case report

Published on: 14th September, 2022

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9625089266

It is utterly important to ensure the safety of stem cell donors and limit the incidence of long-term adverse events. Additionally, the willingness to donate the potentially life-saving stem cells, depends among other reasons, on the donor’s trust in the safety of the procedure as our case highlights. Here we present the case of a 35-year-old patient who developed macrohematuria and proteinuria following peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation. 4 years later he was diagnosed with IgA-nephropathy (IgAN) and the disorder was causally attributed to the PBSC donation. He discouraged his family and friends from registering as donors because of this. In the current case report, we review the literature on the relationship between IgAN and PBSC donation and suggest under which conditions stem cell donation can still be performed even with a prior diagnosis of IgAN.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

The outcome of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma. The experience of King Fahad Specialist Hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia

Published on: 29th September, 2022

Background: Aautologous hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) is the standard of care for newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who are eligible for autologous transplantation. Although cryopreservation is routinely employed, autologous HSCT can be performed using non-cryopreserved stem cells.Methods and materials: A retrospective study of patients with MM who received autologous HSCT between the 10th of October 2010 and the 31st of January 2022 at King Fahad Specialist Hospital (KFSH) in Dammam, Saudi Arabia was performed.Results: Over 11 years and 113 days, a total of 135 autologous HSCTs were performed for 119 patients with MM at our institution. Single autologous HSCTs were performed for 119 patients, while 16 of these patients received either planned tandem autologous transplants or second autografts due to either progression or relapse of their myeloma. The median age of patients with MM at autologous HSCT was 51.5 years. At presentation of their MM, the following high-risk (HR) features were encountered: stage III disease according to the revised international scoring system (RISS) in 12.3%; adverse cytogenetics in 31.93% of patients; advanced bone disease in 60.50%; and renal dysfunction or failure in 11.76% of patients. A total of 104 autologous HSCTs (77.04%) were performed without cryopreservation while 31 autografts (22.96%) were performed using cryopreserved apheresis stem cell products. Additionally, 54 autologous HSCTs (40.00%) were done at outpatient while 81 autografts (60.00%) were performed in an inpatient setting. Survival for 100 days post-HSCT for all patients with MM who received autologous transplants including those done at outpatient was 100%. The 4 years overall survival (OS) an progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with MM who received non- cryopreserved or fresh autologous HSCTs were 82% and 68% respectively.Conclusion: Autologous HSCT without cryopreservation is safe, and feasible and can lead to short-term as well as long-term outcomes that are comparable to autologous transplantation with cryopreservation. Non- cryopreserved autologous grafts allow the performance of autologous transplants in an outpatient setting to save beds and reduce costs.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Validation of Kinetic Stem Cell (KSC) counting algorithms for rapid quantification of human hematopoietic stem cells

Published on: 28th November, 1899

Specific quantification of therapeutic tissue stem cells (TSCs) is a major challenge. We recently described a computational simulation method for accurate and specific counting of TSCs. The method quantifies TSCs based on their unique asymmetric cell kinetics, which is rate-limiting for TSCs’ production of transiently-amplifying lineage-committed cells and terminally arrested cells during serial cell culture. Because of this basis, the new method is called kinetic stem cell (KSC) counting. Here, we report further validations of the specificity and clinical utility of KSC counting. First, we demonstrate its quantification of the expected increase in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fraction of CD34+-selected preparations of human-mobilized peripheral blood cells, an approved treatment product routinely used for HSC transplantation therapies. Previously, we also used the KSC counting technology to define new mathematical algorithms with the potential for rapid determination of TSC-specific fractions without the need for serial culture. A second important HSC transplantation treatment, CD34+-selected umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells, was used to investigate this prediction. We show that, with an input of only simple population doubling time (PDT) data, the KSC counting-derived “Rabbit algorithms” can be used to rapidly determine the specific HSC fraction of CD34+-selected UCB cell preparations with a high degree of statistical confidence. The algorithms define the stem cell fraction half-life (SCFHL), a new parameter that projects stem cell numbers during expansion culture. These findings further validate KSC counting’s potential to meet the long-standing unmet need for a method to determine stem cell-specific dosage in stem cell medicine.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Validation of Kinetic Stem Cell (KSC) counting algorithms for rapid quantification of human hematopoietic stem cells

Published on: 28th November, 2022

Specific quantification of therapeutic tissue stem cells (TSCs) is a major challenge. We recently described a computational simulation method for accurate and specific counting of TSCs. The method quantifies TSCs based on their unique asymmetric cell kinetics, which is rate-limiting for TSCs’ production of transiently-amplifying lineage-committed cells and terminally arrested cells during serial cell culture. Because of this basis, the new method is called kinetic stem cell (KSC) counting. Here, we report further validations of the specificity and clinical utility of KSC counting. First, we demonstrate its quantification of the expected increase in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fraction of CD34+-selected preparations of human-mobilized peripheral blood cells, an approved treatment product routinely used for HSC transplantation therapies. Previously, we also used the KSC counting technology to define new mathematical algorithms with the potential for rapid determination of TSC-specific fractions without the need for serial culture. A second important HSC transplantation treatment, CD34+-selected umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells, was used to investigate this prediction. We show that, with an input of only simple population doubling time (PDT) data, the KSC counting-derived “Rabbit algorithms” can be used to rapidly determine the specific HSC fraction of CD34+-selected UCB cell preparations with a high degree of statistical confidence. The algorithms define the stem cell fraction half-life (SCFHL), a new parameter that projects stem cell numbers during expansion culture. These findings further validate KSC counting’s potential to meet the long-standing unmet need for a method to determine stem cell-specific dosage in stem cell medicine.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat