Peripheral artery disease

Novel paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty via single retrograde popliteal access for challenging superficial femoral artery and iliac artery lesions?

Published on: 24th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8261371866

Objectives: We report our results regarding the use of BioPath™ paclitaxel-coated balloon catheters for superficial or distal external iliac artery revascularization via single retrograde popliteal access. Methods: We included 105 prospective consecutive patients. Single retrograde popliteal access was achieved under ultrasound guidance with the patients laid prone. An over-the-wire atherectomy system was used if risk of distal embolization was high due to plaque intensity of the target lesion. A 4 to 7 mm-diameter BioPath™ 035 balloon catheter was used for all lesions. Follow-up at 6th month included doppler ultrasound examination for patency. Results: Seventy-two patients (68.6%) had total SFA occlusion and 41 patients (39%) had concomitant external iliac artery involvement, out of whom 31 (29.5%) had total occlusion. Procedural success 90.5% for superficial femoral artery and 85.3% for external iliac artery. One-year patency rates in SFA and EIA were 84.8% and 80.4%, respectively Conclusion: Single retrograde popliteal access and drug-coated balloon angioplasty may offer a useful alternative to known modalities in treatment of challenging superficial femoral artery and concomitant iliac artery lesions
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Bleeding complications at the access sites during catheter directed thrombolysis for acute limb ischaemia: Mini review

Published on: 3rd March, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8941332867

Acute and subacute ischemia of the lower limbs represents a major emergency with a high in-hospital mortality, complication, and leg amputation rates. Treatment options for acute limb ischemia include systemic anticoagulation, followed by various catheter based options including infusion of fibrinolytic agents (pharmacological thrombolysis), pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, catheter-mediated thrombus aspiration, mechanical thrombectomy, and any combination of the above or open surgical intervention (thromboembolectomy or surgical bypass). Minor and major bleeding complication during catheter directed thrombolysis (CDT) especially at access site are frequent. Bleeding complications require often an interruption or termination of CDT affecting clinical outcome of the patients. Recently we examined a new access site bleeding protection device during CDT.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat