Prostate cancer

Near Complete Response to 177Lu-PSMA-DKFZ-617 Therapy in a Patient with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

Published on: 5th November, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286424598

Prostate specific membrane antigen, a type II transmembrane protein is an excellent target for the radionuclide therapy in advanced prostate cancer patients due to its high expression in the prostate cancer cells. We present the case of a 69-year old man with advanced metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. In view of rising serum PSA levels despite hormonal and chemotherapy, we decided to perform a 68Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scan (prostate specific membrane antigen). It revealed intense radiotracer uptake in the prostate, lymph nodes and multiple skeletal sites. Five cycles of 177Lu-PSMA-DKFZ-617 radioligand therapy were administered in the patient followed by an intrim 68Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. Intrim 68Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scan demonstrated a near complete remission of disease with a corresponding decrease in the sPSA levels. During the follow-up duration of 12 months, the patient did not develop haematological, kidney and liver toxicity during the course of treatment and follow-up. 177Lu-PSMA-DKFZ-617 is a promising therapeutic option in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients.
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Percentage of Positive Biopsy Cores Predicts Presence of a Dominant Lesion on MRI in Patients with Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer

Published on: 12th October, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7900048359

Background: Biopsy findings of percentage of positive biopsy cores, percentage of cancer volume, and maximum involvement of biopsy cores have been shown to have prognostic value and correlate with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. The relationship of these prognostic biopsy factors to MRI findings of the presence of a dominant lesion, has not yet been investigated. Methods: Sixty-five patients with intermediate risk prostate cancer were included in a retrospective cohort. MRI was acquired using either 1.5 Tesla (T) with endorectal coil or a 3 T MRI unit. Findings of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, and presence and number of dominant lesions were noted. T-test and Cox regression statistical analyses were performed. Results: Patients with one or more dominant lesions on MRI had a significantly higher mean percentage of positive biopsy cores (56.7% vs 39.8%, p=0.004), percentage of cancer volume (23.5% vs 14.5%, p=0.011) and maximum involvement of biopsy cores (62.9% vs 47.3%, p=0.027) than those without a dominant lesion on MRI. On multivariate analysis, only percentage of positive biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor for a dominant lesion on MRI (Hazard Ratio 1.06 [95% CI 1.01-1.12; p=0.02]), whereas prostate-specific antigen, clinical T-stage, Gleason score, percentage of cancer volume, and maximum involvement of biopsy cores were not significant predictors of a dominant lesion on MRI. Receiver-operator characteristic analysis was done and a cutoff value of >=50% was chosen for percentage of positive biopsy cores, >=15% for percentage of cancer volume, >=50% for maximum involvement of biopsy cores. Conclusion: Percentage of positive biopsy cores was found to be a significant predictor for the presence of a dominant lesion on MRI. This finding is hypothesis-generating and should be confirmed with a prospective trial.
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Minimally invasive gracilis muscle transposition: Initial report

Published on: 23rd February, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8861740961

Rectourethral fistula (RUF) is a divesting complication after prostate cancer treatment. The RUF incidence after radical prostatectomy is about 0.5% to 2%, [1,2]. Radiotherapy, criotherapy and high intensity focused ultrasound are other more severe causes [3,4]. Repair of RUF is a challenging surgical procedure. There are some possible approaches but transperineal is the most utilized. In cases of complex fistulas interposition of muscle flaps between the rectum and urethra is highly recommended. Gracilis muscle transposition (GMT) is the preferred, due to excellent mobility and vascularization for perineal reconstruction [5,6]. Dissection of the gracilis muscle is done using one, 2 or 3 large incisions in the medial border of the thigh. The aim of this report is present a new minimally invasive access to obtain a pediculate flap of gracilis muscle to interposition between bladder and rectum to treat RUF.
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“Maximum Preservation Radical Prostatectomy”: Oncological, functional and other contemporary aspects of Retzius Sparing Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

Published on: 30th April, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8861737601

The surgical treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) had as its initial milestone the first prostatectomy, performed by H.H. Young at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, in 1904 [1], however, the procedure only reached a fundamental role after 1982, based on a better understanding and description of the male pelvic anatomy, by Walsh [2-6] and other [7-11]. Subsequently, minimally invasive approaches emerged: laparoscopic prostatectomy (1992) [12] and robot- assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) (2000) [13], which modified and optimized the execution of key surgical steps of this procedure, such as bladder neck preservation, nerve-sparing dissection, and prostate apex management [14].
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Ra-223 dichloride management in a Nuclear Medicine Unit: experience of a referral institution

Published on: 27th August, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286425794

Ra-223 dichloride is a first-in-class alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical recently introduced into clinical practice for treatment of men with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) and symptomatic bone metastases. Due to the proven benefit on Overall Survival and the favorable toxicity profile, Ra-223 therapy is gaining widespread use in both US and Europe. In this article, we describe the routinary management of patients undergoing Ra-223 treatment in our Institution. Currently, Ra-223 therapy is indicated for 6 intravenous injections (55 kBq per kg of body weight) administered every 28 days. In comparison to other radiopharmaceuticals, Ra-223 handling and administration do not need any additional training for authorized users. Due to the minimal external dose rate emission, Ra-223 dichloride can be delivered in an outpatient setting. Moreover, no particular precautions other than standard hygiene measures must be taken by patients’ family members or caregivers. Ra-223 therapy is associated to a favorable hematologic toxicity profile, while non-hematologic adverse events are generally mild and easy to manage. Given the favorable toxicity profile of this treatment, clinical trials are currently ongoing to evaluate efficacy and safety of Ra-223 treatment in combination or sequence with recently approved drugs such as abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and sipuleucel-T. In addition, the recent interest in Ra-223 bone lesion dosimetry could open the way to a dosimetric-based therapeutic approach with Ra-223. In this new scenario, results of these promising clinical trials may help clarifying the optimal sequencing of new therapeutic possibilities for metastatic CRPC and the appropriate eligibility criteria for Ra-223 treatment in oncologic patients.
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The association between hypoxia, chronic ischemia and alters prostate structure and progress of chronic prostatic disease

Published on: 20th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8286560822

Chronic prostatitis today show high level of relapses and recurrent pathological events even if using the best pharmacological therapy. A better understanding of physiopathological effect of ischemic hypoxic condition (pelvic, prostate tissue) and the lymphatic congestion in same body region contribute in evolution of a complex condition. The same focusing the strategy in biofilm reduction or in leukocyte infiltration can be a right way to reduce relapses and progression of the prostatic disease. Hypoxia is also related to prostatic cancer progression and prostatic biofilm if responsible of making a new micro- environment often drug resistance. A deep knowledge in this kind of phenomena can improve the clinical effect of drug therapy.
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We may need to reconsider when to apply sunscreen in our daily life

Published on: 22nd October, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8299748488

Broad-spectrum sunscreens are now widely used worldwide as an adjunct to help prevent sunburn, skin cancers and premature skin aging. In the United States, all persons older than 6 months are recommended to apply sunscreen to all sun-exposed skin from toes to head except eyes and mouth even on cloudy days. Such a recommendation is apparently based on concepts that exposure to sunlight damages the skin, the damage is cumulative and hence any sun exposure should be minimized or prevented. This communication raises several questions suggesting that the above recommendation may need to be reconsidered. For example, numerous previous studies have indicated many potential health benefits from non-burning sun exposure including protection against sunburn, melanoma, colorectal cancer, breast cancer and prostate cancer, increasing vitamin D synthesis, helping sleep, reducing blood pressure, heart attack and stroke. Recent studies suggested that regular lifetime non-burning sun exposure may not result in premature skin aging and the skin aging is mainly caused by the intrinsic factor. Skin aging or whole-body aging has been recently postulated to be mainly attributed to a gradual reduction in cardiac output/index with age and a new anti-aging or age-reversing nutritional theory has been proposed. An apparent lack of long-term cumulative sunray damage was also supported by reported age independence in incidences of sunburn and skin cancers. It is of interest that the current US policy is different from that of World Health Organization and Australia recommending the need of sun protection only when UV Index is 3 or greater. In view of the above, some general guidelines regarding when to best apply sunscreen are proposed.
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Prostate cancer-associated thrombotic microangiopathy: A case report and review of the literature

Published on: 8th March, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8980361223

Background: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare and life-threatening complication of prostate carcinoma. Whether plasma exchange has a role in treatment remains a subject of debate. Here we present a case followed by a systematic review of the literature on this subject. Case report: We describe a 69-year old patient presenting with TMA, which was associated with an underlying metastatic prostate carcinoma. We conducted a search of similar cases in literature. Results: Our patient was treated and responded well on plasma exchange. Systematic review of the literature showed 17 additional cases of TMA associated with prostate carcinoma of which eleven were treated with plasma exchange with mostly good response. Conclusion: Based on current data we cannot exclude a potential role for plasma exchange in prostate cancer associated TMA.
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