Social media

Psychological distress in a social media content moderator: A case report

Published on: 12th October, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8683061313

The expansion of social media platforms has given birth to a specific professional category in charge of « sanitizing » social media and keeping it free of “inappropriate” content. These content moderators, as a result of being constantly exposed to potentially traumatic images, may be at risk of developing stress-related symptoms. Here we present the case of a social media content moderator who experienced intrusive images, anxiety symptoms and insomnia. Literature about this subject is very scarce, while the need is increasing to assess this phenomenon and set up strategies of monitoring, counseling and treating this category of workers. Key points The expansion of social media platforms has given birth to a specific professional category: content moderators. As a result of being constantly exposed to potentially traumatic images, content moderators may be at risk of developing stress-related symptoms. The need is increasing to assess this phenomenon and set up strategies of monitoring, counseling and treating this category of workers.
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Assessment of knowledge, practice and associated factors towards prevention of novel corona virus among clients attending at Debre Tabor General Hospital, Debre Tabor Town, North West Ethiopia, 2020: Institutional based cross-sectional study

Published on: 7th December, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8872655439

Background: Corona virus disease is a highly infectious disease caused by the newly innovated corona virus. An emerging respiratory disease was abbreviated as COVID-19, after it has been first reported in December 2019 in Wuhan city of China. Ethiopia Ministry of health initiated multidisciplinary approach to tackle COVID-19 of which awareness creation is the main. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge, practice and associated factors towards prevention of novel corona virus among clients in Debre Tabor general hospital, Northwest Ethiopia, 2020. Methods: Institution based cross sectional study design was conducted in Debre Tabor General hospital from May 15 to May 30, 2020. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The data were entered into epi data version 4.4 and exported to SPSS window version 25 for analysis. Binary and multivariable logistic regression was fitted. Odds Ratios with 95% Confidence interval and p - value ≤ 0.05 were considered to assert significance. Result: A total of 345 clients were analyzed and the response rate was 96.4%. The mean age was 32.95 with S.D ± 13.18 years. Majority of the respondents were male (75.7%). Among the study participants 54.2% with (95% CI: [49.0, 59.2%]) and 49.0% with (95% CI: [43.5, 53.4%]) have good knowledge and god practice on COVID-19 preventions respectively. Sex AOR: 4.33 (2.06, 9.09), family size AOR: 2.49 (1.01, 6.15 and heard from social media AOR: 2.78 (1.21, 6.39) were significantly associated with knowledge of respondents. Knowledge AOR: 3.11 (1.59, 6.10) was significantly associated with practice of clients. Residency and those heard from TV were significant variables for both. Conclusion and recommendation: In this study the overall knowledge and preventive practices of the respondents were found to be low. Sex, family size, residency and sources of information were associated factors for knowledge. In addition to this knowledge was significant factor for practice. Health education programs aimed at mobilizing and improving COVID-19 related knowledge and practice intend to be strengthened.
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Predicting physical symptoms through expressions of loneliness and anxiety in individuals utilizing social media during SARS-CoV-2

Published on: 25th April, 2022

The effect of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has produced significant health concerns negatively impacting individuals. As the ongoing and constantly changing nature of SARS-CoV-2 continues, the unique characteristics of this pandemic trend toward anxiety and loneliness as significant behavioral health outcomes. Furthermore, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has significantly impacted the utilization of social media platforms such as Twitter. Utilizing over 1.6 million tweets from approximately 988,760 Twitter users geolocated in Washington state from the University of Pennsylvania’s publicly available Twitter database (from March 2020 to March 2021), this study evaluated the impact of SARS-CoV-2 by using expressions of loneliness and anxiety to predict mental and physical symptoms. Bivariate correlations revealed expressions of loneliness were correlated to trouble breathing while expressions of anxiety were correlated to skin lesions, body aches, flu-like, seasonal cold, trouble breathing, nausea or diarrhea, fever, chills, and cough. Multiple multivariate linear regressions were completed, and a significant regression equation was found in predicting trouble breathing symptoms on expressions of loneliness and anxiety, however, the proportion of variance was 8% of the observed variation in the model. Further implications revealed the importance of understanding mental and physical well-being during a public health crisis as well as the use of social media platforms as primary and supplementary stimuli.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat