Adult

Joint Functional Screening for Older Adults: Clinical Prevention of Accidental Fall

Published on: 27th September, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286353711

As people get older, chronic diseases become an important reason of disability while a decline in physical functions is related to aging among the elders, which may lead to dependency and isolation of the older adults. Body asymmetry and imbalance body alignment can bring added stress to the joint structures that can cause dysfunction of the joint, ligaments, tendons, bursas, and related muscles, which in return brings about problem while walking or during activities of daily living. Joint Functional Screening (JFS) is a systemic clinical examination with clinical reasoning of the entire human joints body, with or without causative limitation to derive a holistic analysis of musculoskeletal system. JFS profile helps to assess body disorder of older people. This clinical screening include documentation of balance of the body, lower and upper body strength, joints flexibility, body composition, and body alignment. This is an innovation build to profile a normal musculoskeletal state to decode any anomaly in an otherwise a normal subject, who might be preparing to take up any activities in one’s lifespan that could elicit an injury which could be prevented. JFS could be a useful tool for physiotherapists, exercise therapist or even the personal trainers to screen a body prior to rehabilitative or an exercise program; and this clinical screening is presently a best guidance to prevent risk of fall or injury among individual healthy people and older adult.
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Influence of elbow angle on the reliability and validity of bioelectrical impedance analysis

Published on: 23rd November, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286351075

Hand-to-hand bioelectrical impedance (HH BIA) is a low-cost method to estimate percent body fat (%BF). The BIA method is consistently reliable, but questions on validity remain. We have observed anecdotally that elbow position can render consistently different measures of %BF while using HH BIA, thus leading to the question: Does elbow angle influence the validity of measures derived using HH BIA? The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of elbow position (i.e., IN=flexed to 90° versus OUT=fully extended) on the reliability of HH BIA on 44 male and 24 female healthy adults (age=21±2 yrs, BMI=23±3). An additional aim was to assess the validity of the HH BIA %BF on a subset of subjects (n=12) using air displacement plethysmography (BOD POD®) as the criterion measure. The IN position was ~4%BF lower than the OUT position for HH BIA (p=0.05, effect size=0.67). Measures of %BF for both trials for the IN [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.99, coefficient of variation (CV)=2.99%] and OUT (ICC=0.99, CV=1.48%) conditions were highly reliable. On the subsample, the OUT (18.3±6.7 %BF) position exceeded both the IN (14.5±7.4 %BF) and the BOD POD® (16.1±7.8 %BF) measures (p<0.05); however, IN and BOD POD® measures of %BF did not differ (p=0.21). These findings support that HH BIA is a reliable measure at both elbow positions; however, %BF estimations vary considerably (~4%) with respect to the criterion measure depending on elbow position. The OUT position was found to overestimate criteria %BF. Further research may reveal an optimum elbow angle position for HH BIA estimates of %BF.
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Chondrogenic re-differentiation potential of chondrocytes after monolayer culture: Comparison between osteoarthritis and young adult patients

Published on: 27th March, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8049578277

Purpose: Monolayer passage of chondrocytes results in dramatic phenotypic changes. This “de-differentiation” is expected to restore the chondrogenic properties such as “re-differentiation” in autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The purpose of this study was to compare the chondrogenic re-differentiation potential of chondrocytes, from osteoarthritis (OA) patients and young adult patients, after monolayer culture. Methods: Chondrocytes from five old patients with knee OA (OAC) and five young patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation (non-OAC) were used. The chondrocytes from passages 1 to 3 were analyzed for the expression of cell surface markers (CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD44) by flow cytometric analysis. Chondrocytes of passage 4 were cultured as pellets for re-differentiation and evaluated histologically. Real-time PCR were performed to measure the chondrogenic related genes transcriptional levels. Results: OAC and non-OAC had comparable positive ratios for CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105. The expression of CD105 was upregulated from passage 1 to passage 3 in OAC, and it increased at the same level as in non-OAC during passage 2 and 3. The expression of COL2 decreased from passage 1 to passage 3 in both the groups. There were no statistical differences in the Bern Scores between OAC and non-OAC. Conclusion: The chondrocytes from OA patients and young adult patients had chondrogenic re-differentiation potential. The changes in cell surface markers and chondrogenic related genes showed similarity for both the groups. Our findings suggest that OAC can become the cell source for ACI.
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Parents Take-On Concussion: Advances in Sideline Research and Culture in Youth Sports

Published on: 16th March, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286354252

Identifying concussion and initiating removal from play is challenging for even the most diligent youth sports organizations. Empowering parents to implement removal from play protocols and sideline testing may be the most practical plan at community levels to protect young athletes. We developed paradigms for community-based youth sports teams that incorporated both standard concussion protocols and research investigations. The research studies were designed to determine how sideline tests of vision, cognition and balance augment the capacity for parents and other responsible adults to identify youth athletes with concussion in ice hockey, football, lacrosse and cheerleading. Research-based sideline tests were performed at pre-season baseline sessions and during the season at the time of injury or as soon as symptoms were recognized by trained volunteer parent team testers. The combination of standard concussion protocols and research studies were performed for 510 athletes, aged 5-17 years, over 2.5 years through 5 athletic seasons. To implement the protocols and studies, approximately 80 student volunteers and parents were educated and trained on early concussion recognition and on baseline and sideline test administration. Over 80% of parent-identified head injuries were physician-confirmed concussions. Of the sideline tests performed, over two-thirds were administered within 24 hours of injury; the rest were performed within an average of 2.6 days post-injury since some athletes had delayed development of symptoms. Removal from play guidelines and standard concussion evaluation protocols were maintained in the context of the sideline testing research investigations. Based on this observational study, parents of youth athletes can be successfully empowered to perform rapid sideline tests in the context of existing concussion protocols. Implementation of objective testing may improve concussion identification and shift the culture of advocacy and responsibility towards parent groups to promote safety of young athletes. Ongoing investigations will further examine the impact of these programs on concussion management in youth sports.
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Congenital Quadricuspid Aortic Valve, a Rare Cause of Aortic Insufficiency in Adults: Case Report

Published on: 23rd January, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286350758

Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is rare congenital malformation of the aortic valve with estimated prevalence of 0.013% to 0.043% [1-4]. QAV is most commonly associated with aortic insufficiency (AI), which is found in almost 75% of cases [5]. QAV can also be associated with other cardiac defects such as ventricular or atrial septal defects, patent ductus arteriosus, subaortic fibromuscular stenosis, malformation of the mitral valve, and coronary anomalies [3]. Up to 40% of all patients with QAV undergo aortic valve replacement surgery most commonly due to progressive AI in 88% of case [2,3,6]. Here we report a case from our institution of a woman with QAV with severe AI and anomalous origin of the right coronary artery.
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Are S-Klotho’s Maximal concentrations dependent on Exercise Intensity and Time in young adult males?

Published on: 8th March, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8028501965

The purpose of the present study was to define the period of time in which aerobic training does not increase further serum S-Klotho levels in untrained young adult males, and to examine the relation between plasma S-Klotho concentration and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Methods: Sixty (60) untrained subjects (27.05±1.1 years) were divided into 2 groups, both exercised six months 4×wk-1 for the duration of 45 min×session. One group (LTI) exercised below the anaerobic threshold at 40-50% of VO2max, while the second group (HTI) worked above the anaerobic threshold at 65-70% of VO2max. Testing sessions were performed at 0, 2, 4, and 6 months. Blood samples were drawn after overnight fasting; S-Klotho was analyzed using an ELISA kit. Results: Following 2 and 4 months, significant (p≤0.05) increases were noted in the HTI group, at the fourth testing session, S-Klotho leveled off. In the LTI group, S-Klotho remained almost unchanged. Findings of the present study, support emerging evidence suggesting that a relation between plasma S-Klotho concentration and VO2max exists. Conclusion: Data suggest that increases in S-Klotho is tidally associated with VO2max levels. In addition, the S-Klotho increase levels-off following 4 months of aerobic training. Exercising below the anaerobic threshold does not increase VO2max and thus, does not increase S-Klotho.  
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Anomalies of coronary artery origin: About two cases

Published on: 13th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8270707766

Anomalies of coronary artery origin are congenital malformations characterized by the abnormal birth of a coronary artery from the controlateral coronary aortic sinus (birth of the left coronary artery from the right sinus or birth of the right coronary artery from the left sinus). The artery concerned has an abnormal initial path between the aorta and the pulmonary artery; this segment is most often intramural, in the aortic wall. They are rare with a prevalence (0.1% to 0.3% of the population). They pose a high risk of sudden stress death related to exercise myocardial ischemia. The most common mode of discovery is aborted sudden death, but sometimes fortuitously. The contribution of multi-round CT is described for the positive diagnosis of these anatomical variations, sometimes delicate in coronary angiography, but also for the distinction between “benign” and “malignant” forms, potentially responsible for myocardial ischemia. Treatment is usually surgical in symptomatic forms. We report the cases of two patients with coronary connection abnormalities discovered in adulthood.
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Plaque morphology in diabetic vs. non diabetic patients assessed by Multi-Slice Computed Tomography coronary angiography

Published on: 4th October, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8333008298

Background and Objectives: Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) provides high accuracy for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). The introduction of the latest computed tomography technology allows comprehensive evaluation of various aspects of CAD, including the coronary calcium score, coronary artery stenosis, bypass patency, and myocardial function. This study aimed to assess the effect of DM on coronary arteries evaluated by MSCT-CA Comparing Plaque Morphology in Diabetic patients with Non-Diabetic Whoever Controlled or not assessed by HbA1c. Methods: In this study we randomly assigned 150 adult patients were diagnosed with suspected coronary artery disease underwent MSCT-CA for evaluation their coronaries regarding luminal stenosis, Plaque analysis, Remodeling index, SSS, SIS and Ca score. Results: There was statistically significant difference between diabetics & non-diabetic groups in LM lesions with (P = 0.029). also, the results of multivariate logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age and sex, diabetics were shown a trend toward more mixed plaque with statistically significant {(OR): 3.422, 95% CI 1.66-7.023, P = 0.001}; whereas, after adjustment for age, sex, history of hypertension, smoking, and hypercholesterolemia, patients with diabetes also shown a trend toward more mixed plaque with statistically significant (OR: 3.456, 95% CI 1.668-7.160, P = 0.001). It means significant differences in coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden and composition between diabetic and non-diabetic patients, with a higher proportion of mixed plaques, a more vulnerable form of atherosclerotic plaque in diabetics (P < 0.001) otherwise No significant difference. Conclusion: MSCT angiography may be useful for the identification of CAD in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. There were statistically significant differences in coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden and composition, with a higher proportion of mixed plaques, between diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Furthermore, MSCT may give accurate information about plaque characteristics according to different coronary risk factors, thereby identifying high risk features warranting a more intensive anti-atherosclerotic treatment.   
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Long-Term Impact of Coronary Artery Disease in Lung Transplantation

Published on: 26th November, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8440605468

Background: Adoption of the Lung Allocation Score (LAS) has led to increased listing of older patients and those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) for lung transplantation (LTX). Older patients and those with IPF have higher prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD), a relative contraindication for LTX. The impact of the LAS on CAD prevalence and cardiovascular morbidity in LTX recipients is unknown. Methods: Retrospective review of single institution database from January 2000 to December 2010. Patients with and without CAD were compared by age, gender, LAS, single vs double LTX, and transplant indication. Survival was calculated by Kaplan-Meier method, and statistical significance determined by log-rank method. Survival analysis was performed on all patients and by 3:1 propensity matching. Differences in CAD, gender, and indication were determined by Chi-squared test. Differences in LAS and age were calculated with a two-tailed t - test. Results: In the pre-LAS era, 6.2% (9/145) recipients had CAD vs. 9.2% (17/184) in the post-LAS era (p = 0.411). Among all patients, recipients with CAD had a worse long term survival as estimated by Kaplan-Meier method (p = 0.001), although there was no statistically significant difference after propensity matching ((p = 0.14). Although more recipients in the post-LAS era had a diagnosis of IPF [15/145 vs. 71/184 patients, (p < 0.001)], there was no difference in the prevalence of CAD in the IPF cohort compared to others. There were no differences in cardiovascular deaths among recipients with CAD, with IPF, or in the post-LAS era. Patients with a pre-transplant diagnosis of CAD had an descreased risk of new onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) (p = 0.007; HR:0.133; CI:0.030-0.583). Conclusion: Adoption of the LAS was not associated with a significant change in proportion of recipients with CAD who underwent LTX at our institution, despite an increase in recipients with IPF. Recipients with CAD had a higher risk of developing new postoperative AF and worse survival than patients without CAD. Differences in survival, however, could not be attributed directly to CAD based on propensity matched analysis
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The mechanisms of cardiac myopathies, a kinetics approach: Leading review

Published on: 16th July, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8631130997

The normal adult heart is a well maintained machine that has a mechanism for growth replacement of the sarcomere that is lost by natural degeneration. This process ensures the heart has the strength of contraction to function correctly giving blood supply to the whole body. Some of the force of contraction of the sarcomere is transmitted to its major protein titin where its strength results in unfolding of a flexible section and release of a growth stimulant. The origin of all the cardiomyopathies can be traced to errors in this system resulting from mutations in a wide variety of the sarcomeric proteins. Too much or chronic tension transfer to titin giving increased growth resulting in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and too little leading to muscle wastage, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). HCM can ultimately lead to sudden cardiac death and DCM to heart failure. In this paper I show (1) a collection of the tension/ATPase calcium dependencies of cardiac myofibrils that define the mechanism of Ca2+ cooperativity. (2) I then reintroduce the stress/strain relationship to cardiomyopathies. (3) I then review the cardiomyopathy literature that contains similar Ca2+ dependency data to throw light on the mechanisms involved in generation of the types of myopathies from the mutations involved. In the review of cardiomyopathy there are two sections on mutations, the first dealing with those disrupting the Ca2+ cooperativity, i.e. the Hill coefficient of activation, leading to incomplete relaxation in diastole, chronic tension, and increased growth. Secondly dealing with those where the Ca2+ cooperativity is not affected giving either increased or decreased tension transfer to titin and changes in sarcomere growth. 
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Muscle growth and control of production of sarcomere components

Published on: 12th March, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8958448210

Here I contrast the skeletal and cardiac muscle in terms of the control muscle growth and of sarcomere component synthesis. The differences are major and reflect the long term needs of the two systems. With the skeletal system there is growth of both the number of myocytes and the sarcomere components within them dependent on demand made of the muscle. Unlike skeletal muscles the normal adult heart is greatly restricted in size, number of myocytes and their content of contractile proteins, i.e. there is little change on demand. Over time proteins get damaged or decay and for the normal heart this implies a strictly controlled maintenance synthesis of sarcomere components. From the studies of abnormal, mutated systems there is one thing inherent to and more pronounced in cardiac muscle, the FrankStarling Law of the Heart derived from the angiotensin ii type 1 receptor that my studies indicate is central to the control of sarcomere component synthesis.
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Exploring novel medical applications for commonly used veterinary drug (tilmicosin antibiotic)

Published on: 31st August, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7325099093

Tilmicosin (TMC) is a semi synthetic macrolide antibiotic of tylosin derivatives commonly used by veterinaries, has been shown to reveal beneficial pharmacological activities. In the current study, the potential wound healing activity, Anti-oxidant effect (ulcer and hepatoprotective) were investigated. Anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, analgesic (central and peripheral), hypnotic and antispasmodic activity were also screened. This study included adult both sexes of rats (200-250 gm), mice (20-25 gm) and adult rabbits. Experimental wound was induced on the anterior-dorsal side of each rat whereas, ulcer induced by ethanol causing mucosal damage in rats. The oral anti-inflammatory induced through formalin producing edema, antipyretic (Brewer’s yeast induced hyperthermia) and analgesic (writhing test, hot plate method, tail immersion method) while hypnotic effects induced through thiopental sodium. Anti-spasmodic effect on isolated organs (intestinal and uterine muscles) using new method of Modular Single Chamber Organ Bath were carried out on experimental animals. Tilmicosin antibiotic at different two doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg b.wt., has an important role in treatment of ulcer (cytoprotective effect) and improvement the wound healing processes besides anti-inflammatory, analgesics, and anti-pyretic effects. Tilmicosin revealed also hypnotic and intestinal anti-spasmodic effects but showed Pharmacovigilence hepatotoxic effect through the histopathological studies which revealed sever hepatic damage especially at larger dose.
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Effects of Fast-Walking on Muscle Activation in Young Adults and Elderly Persons

Published on: 20th January, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286424597

Coactivation of agonist and antagonist muscles participates in the regulation of joint stiffness and postural instability. Alterations on muscle activity have been revealed as an important falling risk factor. It is unclear the effects, and age-related differences, of a prolonged demanding task on the muscular coactivation levels. We compared muscle activation amplitude and coactivation of the vastus medialis, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius medialis from surface EMG in 16 young adults (age 21-33) and 8 elderly adults (age 66-72) while fast-walking at 70% of their maximum heart rate. Overall, the elderly demonstrated higher coactivation indexes than the young individuals. Ankle coactivation decreased in the first half of the swing phase, while coactivation at the knee increased in the latter half of the swing phase in our elders. Alterations of muscle activation and coactivation on the knee and ankle were more prominent close to landing and in the swing phase. Our results suggest that these alterations may suggest potential concerns with respect to the risk of falls.
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Canine Distemper Virus detection based in Hemaglutinine Gene as target in Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction

Published on: 27th December, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7964755439

Canine Distemper have become a major concern within the veterinary clinical work. Thus, the appearance of many cases of canine distemper in adult animals with their vaccination plan up to date has alarmed veterinarians. Many cases of canine distemper have become a major concern within the clinical veterinary task. The purpose of this work was to detect the gene of hemagglutinin of the virus canine distemper, by using the Polymerase Chain Reaction associated with Reverse transcription (RT-PCR), as confirmation of the clinical diagnosis of disease. For this, peripheral blood samples of animals were used clinically patients and were grouped according to their date of extraction and using vaccines commercial as control. The results allow to demonstrate a high sensitivity of the technique, besides allowing the use of samples up to seven days of storage at 4°C, despite the fragility of RNA viral. Detection of canine distemper virus haemagglutinin gene in field samples and its high sensitivity, suggests studying its use as a diagnostic tool complementary to the clinical diagnosis of canine distemper in our country.
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A great mimicker of Bone Secondaries: Brown Tumors, presenting with a Degenerative Lumber Disc like pain

Published on: 17th July, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317646408

This report presents an adult patient suffering from sacroiliitis like low back pain, lumbosacral radiculopathy and elbow swelling. Multimodality imaging revealed multiple lytic bone lesions located in supra acetabular iliac bone, sacrum, and distal end of radius. Painful numerous lesions due to the extension to the articular surfaces are not expected for Brown tumors. Less than ten cases with multiple Brown tumor due to primary hyperparathyroidism has been reported. Although Brown tumors are mostly diagnosed incidentally, this case would awake the physicians about rheumatological symptoms in the presentation of Brown tumors. Since Brown tumors are non-touch bone lesions that are expected to regress after parathyroid adenoma removal, it is important to distinguish Brown tumors from the giant cell tumors.
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Evaluation of Horizontal Lip Position in Adults with Different Skeletal Patterns: A Cephalometric Study

Published on: 10th March, 2017

Aim: To evaluate sexual dimorphism in horizontal lip position in adults with different skeletal patterns. Material and Methods: The sample comprised of 120 patients (Females 18 years and above, Males 21 years and above) with no history of previous orthodontic treatment or functional jaw orthopaedic treatment. They were divided into different groups based on the ANB angle and gender. Group I and II included 30 males and 30 females with skeletal class I malocclusion (ANB 0-4 degree). Group III and IV included 30 males and 30 females with skeletal class II malocclusion respectively (ANB above 4 degree). Results: When comparison between males and females (Class I+Class II) was done S-line (p<0.001), B-line (p<0.001), E-line (p<0.001), Holdaways angle (p<0.001) and Merrifield angle (p<0.001) were found to be statistically significant. S-line (p<0.001), E-line (p<0.001) and Holdaways angle (p<0.001) were found to be statistically significant when comparison was done between males and females (Class I). When comparison was done between males and females (Class II) only Holdaways angle (p<0.001) showed a significant statistical difference. Conclusion: Sexual dimorphism was found in various lip parameters. Significant amount of differences were found between Class I and Class II (male and female) subjects.
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Normal Value of Skull Base Angle Using the Modified Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique in Thai Population

Published on: 20th March, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286350678

Purpose: To determine the normal value of basal angle measured using the modified MR imaging technique in Thai population compared with the standard value obtained from the Western population. Material and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated midline sagittal SE T1 weighted MR images in 200 adults and 50 children. The basal angle of the skull base was measured using the modified MR imaging technique described by Koenigsberg et al. The angle was formed by a line extending across the anterior cranial fossa to the tip of the dorsum sellae and another line drawn along the posterior margin of the clivus. The mean values of the basal angles among different age groups and sex were calculated and analyzed. Results: The mean skull base angle of our adult population was 115° (range 100.5°-130°, SD=5.7) with an inter-observer agreement of 0.85, slightly smaller than the previous study from the USA which was 117°. There was no significant difference between the male and female groups. The mean skull base angle in our children population was 114.7° (range 102- 130.5°, SD=6.3) with an inter-observer agreement of 0.89, quite similar to the previous USA study which was 114°. There was no significant difference between adult and children. Conclusion: The mean adult skull base angle measured using the modified MR imaging technique in Thai population was slightly smaller than the Western population, while the mean skull base angle of children was quite similar. The basal angle range of 103.6°-126.4° may be used as a guide for the potential range of normal skull base angles in Thai population and possibly also the Southeast Asian population.
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The Risk-Adjusted Impact of Intraoperative Hemofiltration on Real-World Outcomes of Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

Published on: 27th February, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317597137

Objectives: The role of perioperative hemofiltration (HF) in adult patients with impaired renal function undergoing cardiac surgery is controversial. There are suggestions that it may be beneficial for high risk patients undergoing prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery. However, long term outcomes in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients have not been investigated. Methods: To address this we retrospectively followed 7620 patients who underwent CABG between April 2001 and March 2006. Logistic regression was used to risk adjust in-hospital outcomes. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to risk adjust Kaplan-Meier freedom from death curves. Outcomes were adjusted for American Heart Association and American College of College of Cardiology recommended variables. Results: 113 patients had intraoperative HF, 38 had postoperative HF and control group of 7006 that had no HF. After adjusting for differences in case-mix, patients with preoperative kidney disease who received postoperative HF proportionately had significantly higher rates of hospital deaths as compared with intraoperative HF patients. In addition, 5-year follow-up risk-adjusted freedom from death indicated significant differences between intraoperative HF group and postoperative HF patients. Conclusions: These findings support the hypothesis that after adjusting for differences in case mixes, the use of intraoperative hemofiltration may offer superior short term clinical outcomes and longer-term survival benefits for patients with preoperative kidney disease.
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Comparison of Lung Function of normal and persons with chronic low back pain and its relation with duration and severity of Chronic Low Back Pain

Published on: 13th October, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286424899

Introduction: Chronic low back pain is one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders. Studies have shown certain relations between physical fitness and chronic low back pain (CLBP) by examine some measures of physical fitness. The aim of study was to measure lung function using winspiro PRO in patient with CLBP versus normal healthy individual, and relation of lung function with duration and intensity of CLBP. Methodology: The study population is comprised of a total of 120 adult persons. 60 subjects with chronic low back pain (41 male and 19 female) with a mean age of 30.69 years (+4.34) and 60 normal individual (39 male and 21 female) with mean age of 29.00 years (+5.34). Results:The result of comparison of the respiratory parameter forced vital capacity (FVC), and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) of individual with CLBP show a significant difference as compare to the normal healthy population. In unrelated ‘t’ test the patient with CLBP (N=60) of age 30.51(SD±4.33), height 169cm (SD±1.23), weight 57.86(SD±7.73) and body mass index (BMI) 20.46 (SD±2.54) show a significant difference in respiratory parameter FVC ( t=17.244, P=0.000), and MVV ( t=11.048, P=0.000) as compare to the normal healthy persons (N=60) of age 29.79 (SD±5.28), height 170cm (SD±1.13), weight 59.40(SD±6.97) and BMI 21.59 (SD±3.29).In patient group- FVC range is 34.0% to 75.00% (52.85%±9.30). MVV range is 45.0% to 86.80%. (63.11%±12.06)In control group FVC range is 63.90% to 98.83% (83.63%±7.59). MVV range is 63.00% to 98.00% (78.96%±7.86). Conclusions:The overall result of the study show that there is a significant difference in the respiratory parameter that is FVC (forced vital capacity), and the MVV (maximum voluntary ventilation) in persons with chronic low back pain as compare to the healthy person of same age, height, weight and body mass index (BMI).
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Rehabilitation of proximal humerus fractures: An environmental scan of Canadian physiotherapy practice patterns

Published on: 20th September, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286350490

Background: Proximal humerus fractures (PHFs) are common injuries particularly in older adults. Evidence-based protocols for PHF rehabilitation are lacking and physiotherapists use a variety of interventions. Purpose: To determine practice patterns and perceptions of physiotherapists who treat adults with PHF in Ontario, Canada. Method: A paper and pencil survey asking about respondent demographics and management of Neer Group 1 (minimally/nondisplaced) and complex (displaced 3- and 4-part) PHF was mailed to 875 randomly selected physiotherapists who were registered with the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario in 2013/2014 and working in practice areas likely to be accessed by adults with PHF. Results: The response rate was low (10%); 83 physiotherapists completed the survey - 80% had experience managing PHF. Respondents treated 1-5 individuals with PHF annually; more treated Neer Group 1 PHF (89%) than complex PHF (68%). Most individuals with PHF were older than 60 years (64%), female (76%) and accessed physiotherapy through a doctor’s referral (91%) more than 1 month post injury (33%). Main findings: Physiotherapists manage PHF using multi-component interventions and a minimum of 76% include the following elements: education and progression of passive, active assisted, active range of motion exercises and muscle retraining to build coordination and strength. Use of other elements was variable. The main factors influencing the treatment plan were the ability of the individual with PHF to comply, bone quality, and fracture type. Most respondents were unsure that there is sufficient PHF rehabilitation literature to guide treatment. Conclusions:This environmental scan is the first North American study to document practice patterns and attitudes of physiotherapists providing PHF rehabilitation. Elements used by physiotherapists in Ontario treating small numbers of individuals with Neer Group 1 or complex PHFs each year align well with the limited PHF rehabilitation literature available. Potential implications:Multi-disciplinary collaborations to design and conduct large, high quality, multi-centre prognostic studies and RCTs that evaluate the effectiveness of key aspects of non-surgical PHF rehabilitation in various patient groups are needed. Meanwhile, consensus guidelines should be developed in the context of region-specific physiotherapy service models to inform best practice in PHF rehabilitation management.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat