CCHD

Diagnosis of critical congenital heart defects in Iceland 2000-2014

Published on: 4th November, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8301342754

Critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs) are preferably diagnosed prenatally or soon after birth. Late diagnosis has been related to poorer prognosis. The aim of this study is to assess when CCHDs are diagnosed in Iceland and whether late diagnosis is a problem. All live born children in Iceland and foetuses diagnosed with CCHDs during the years 2000-2014 were included. CCHD was defined as a defect requiring intervention or causing death in the first year of life, or leading to abortion. The total number of pre- and postnatal diagnosis of CCHDs was 188. Prenatal diagnosis was made in 69 of 188 (36.7%). Of 69 diagnosed prenatally 33 were terminated due to CCHD. Of the 155 live born children with CCHD, 36 (23.2%) had a prenatal diagnosis and 100 (64.5%) were diagnosed shortly after birth, before discharge from birth facility. 19 children (12.3%) were diagnosed late, that is after discharge from birth facility. Coarctation of the aorta was the most common CCHD diagnosed late (6/19). Prenatal screening and newborn examination give good results in diagnosis of CCHDs in Iceland. Late diagnosis are relatively few, but both the number of prenatally diagnosed CCHDs and CCHDs diagnosed shortly after birth can be further improved.
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Complex cyanotic congenital heart disease presenting as congenital heart block in a Nigerian infant: case report and literature review

Published on: 11th April, 2022

Background: The prevalence of cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CCHD) varies world wide. It accounts for a third of all congenital heart diseases. The common CCHD includes Tetralogy of Fallot(TOF), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR), truncus arteriosus, and tricuspid atresia (TA). Less common variants include Ebstein’s anomaly, Hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia, and single ventricle. Children of all ages can be are affected. The commonest presentation is cyanosis. Bradycardia and/or congenital heart block are rare presentations and mostly occur in the presence of an associated congenital atrioventricular block.Case report: We report a case of a 3-month-old female presenting with congenital heart block and bradycardia at 3 months of age and found to have complex cyanotic congenital heart disease on echocardiography.Conclusion: An infant presenting with bradycardia clinically should be screened for congenital heart defect as bradycardia may be an ominous sign of serious underlying cardiac defect.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat