Caregiver

Determinants of women’s perceived satisfaction on Antenatal care in urban Ghana: A cross-sectional study

Published on: 2nd July, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8175476956

Despite evidence on major interventions on the uptake and scale up of interventions meant to promote maternal health care services, little is known about adequate use of such program in urban Ghana among reproductive aged women. This study examined the determinants of women’s Satisfaction on antenatal care use in selected health facilities in the Kwabre East Municipality of Ghana. Using facility-based cross-sectional survey design, a three-stage sampling technique was conducted to sample 220 women attending postnatal care at selected public health facilities. Open-ended questionnaires were used to obtain data from respondents. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics including binary logit regression model were used to analyze the data with the help of SPSS and STATA software. Logit analytical framework was computed to determine equations of variance. The association between antenatal care use and women’s satisfaction was determined and assessed using Pearson’s χ2 (2) test indicating 1% was run. Most women (92.7%) had at least four ANC visits during their entire pregnancy. The results indicate standard deviation of 7 with 81% regular ANC visits and 19% irregular. Most women (55%) received care by one caregiver, followed by women (35%) who received care by two caregivers and women (10%) who were cared for by three caregivers. The regression results showed varying utilization levels of 10%, 5% & 1% ANC satisfaction. System induced factors aimed at promoting maternal care use satisfaction are suggested. 
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Palliative care approach to oncological patient – Main points

Published on: 31st March, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8566861688

According to the World Health Organization definition, palliative care is an approach aimed at increasing the quality of life of patients and their relatives by addressing physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs and treating conditions early, such as pain while they are coming to terms with a life-threatening disease [1]. Palliative care services have started a rapid progress in developed countries such as Scandinavian countries, England and Canada since the beginning of 1990 [2]. Although palliative care cares for any patient who is in need of care, whether bed-bound or unable to look after themselves, one of the main area of interest is of course oncological patients and their relatives. Patients with advanced cancer, frequent sufferings from physical and psychological symptoms - primarily pain, reduced functional capacity, and reduced quality of life are in the scope of palliative care protocol [3]. The most common end-of-life symptoms and signs in palliative cancer patients are pain, anorexia, nausea, cachexia, weakness, dyspnea, ascites, anxiety, agitation, delirium, confusion and pressure sores. In order to achieve quality and continuous care in case management, a family doctor, specific branch specialist, nurse, dietician, psychologist, cleric, etc. should work together in a multidisciplinary approach and clinical guidelines and care protocols should be implemented [4]. However, it should be kept in mind that increasing the medication dose may not always be beneficial to the oncological patients in palliative services. The goal should always be maximum benefit with minimal tests and treatment. Palliative care does not aim to accelerate or postpone death; but it has many benefits in cancer patients and their relatives including the integration of the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of patient care into physical care, providing support for patients to live as active as possible until the last moment, improving the quality of life and the disease process, providing help and support in the grieving process [1,5]. Providing good care to advanced cancer patients requires that caregivers are educated and supported about their patients’ physical, psychological and social care needs. Balancing the physical and emotional needs of the caregivers will reduce the stress they experience, as well as increase the quality of life of their patients [6,7]. Professionalism in palliative care comes into play right at this point. There is no consensus in the medical world about by whom, when and to whom palliative care should be given. In this regard, the conflicts of opinion between specific branches such as anesthesia, internal medicine and neurology are inevitable. We think that the team leader should be a family physician or a palliative care specialist. The reason for this is the family medicine’s principles of core competencies including biopsycosocial, holistic, comprehensive approach and equal distance to specific branches. Of course when the palliative care specialist is the team leader the patient’s own family doctor still provides invaluable service because of his intimate and long-term knowledge about the patients. One key difference in some countries is that no distinction is being made between palliative and hospice care. Neither the insurance companies nor the state demands such classification because it doesn’t serve any practical purpose at the moment. However, in due time such distinction will be inevitable as one of the cost-cutting measure. Medical oncology will have to report about the expected survival of the cancer patients and it will further increase their workload given the exponential increase in cancer cases.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Implications on mental health by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic: The role of general practitioner

Published on: 5th May, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8588739409

Coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) pandemic gives rise to a significant number of psychological consequences and health problems. The GP must recognize the feelings generated in their patients and address them. This task includes 4 areas: 1. Knowing and managing the epidemic of anxiety and fear in patients; 2. Assessing possible de-compensation of patients with previous mental problems; 3. Knowing and managing effects of quarantine and social distancing; and 4. Knowing and managing possible truncated mourning. The recommendations for GPs intervention are: 1) In the clinical interview (identify maladaptive thoughts and emotions; comprehensive health); 2) Health information (clear, evidence-based communication); 3) Health education (healthy behaviors); 4) Telecare (support, monitoring and attention over the phone, via WhatsApp or video calls); 5) Crisis interventions (psycho education, cognitive behavioral techniques or referral to specialist); 6) Bibliotherapy (free electronic copies for the public); 7) Special efforts directed at vulnerable populations (infected and sick patients, the elderly, with a compromised immune function and those living or receiving care in congregated settings and people with adverse medical, psychiatric or with substance use problems, their families and caregivers); 8) Psychosocial monitoring (stressors related to COVID-19: exposures to infected sources, infected family members, loss of loved ones and physical distancing, secondary adversities such as economic loss, psychosocial effects such as depression, anxiety, psychosomatic concerns, insomnia, increased use of substances and domestic violence, and vulnerability indicators such as pre-existing physical or psychological conditions); and 9) Follow-up of the “complicated” mourning (“accompaniment” and transmit compassion, love and affection).
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Burnout and Related Factors in Caregivers of outpatients with Schizophrenia

Published on: 9th March, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317652087

Objectives: Care of a person with schizophrenia involves multiple problems, possibly leading to burnout which is a culturally influenced phenomenon. The aim of this study was to investigate burnout and related factors in caregivers of outpatients with schizophrenia. Methods: Subjects included in the study were 40 primary caregivers of outpatients with schizophrenia (15 males, 25 females) whom were assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Patients were also administered the Calgary Depression Scale (CDS). Also, sociodemographic information about patients and their caregivers were taken. The significance of differences between two groups was determined by Mann-Whitney U-test. The relationships between the variables were evaluated by Pearson correlation analysis. Results: No significant difference was found in the MBI subscale scores in terms of caregivers gender, marital status, and education, being a family member, having enough information about the illness and taking support during caregiving. Emotional Exhaustion and Personal Accomplishment subscale scores of the caregivers were significantly different in terms of patients’ adaptation to treatment or not (respectively; p=0.010, p=0.030). The MBI-Emotional Exhaustion scores revealed significant positive correlations with the BDI and BAI total scores. Also, the MBI- Depersonalization scores and the BAI scores were positively correlated. Conclusions: Burnout levels in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia were lower when compared with other cultures. Only treatment compliance predicted burnout, while other factors were excluded. Therefore, professionals have to help to patients primarily adapt to their treatment.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Ra-223 dichloride management in a Nuclear Medicine Unit: experience of a referral institution

Published on: 27th August, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286425794

Ra-223 dichloride is a first-in-class alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical recently introduced into clinical practice for treatment of men with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) and symptomatic bone metastases. Due to the proven benefit on Overall Survival and the favorable toxicity profile, Ra-223 therapy is gaining widespread use in both US and Europe. In this article, we describe the routinary management of patients undergoing Ra-223 treatment in our Institution. Currently, Ra-223 therapy is indicated for 6 intravenous injections (55 kBq per kg of body weight) administered every 28 days. In comparison to other radiopharmaceuticals, Ra-223 handling and administration do not need any additional training for authorized users. Due to the minimal external dose rate emission, Ra-223 dichloride can be delivered in an outpatient setting. Moreover, no particular precautions other than standard hygiene measures must be taken by patients’ family members or caregivers. Ra-223 therapy is associated to a favorable hematologic toxicity profile, while non-hematologic adverse events are generally mild and easy to manage. Given the favorable toxicity profile of this treatment, clinical trials are currently ongoing to evaluate efficacy and safety of Ra-223 treatment in combination or sequence with recently approved drugs such as abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and sipuleucel-T. In addition, the recent interest in Ra-223 bone lesion dosimetry could open the way to a dosimetric-based therapeutic approach with Ra-223. In this new scenario, results of these promising clinical trials may help clarifying the optimal sequencing of new therapeutic possibilities for metastatic CRPC and the appropriate eligibility criteria for Ra-223 treatment in oncologic patients.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Paediatric Medicines: Formulation Considerations

Published on: 31st July, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317595687

The use of unlicensed and off-label medicines in children is widespread and has raised an increasing concern over the last years. The majority of medicines taken by children are extemporaneously compounded by pharmacist, and there is a lack of information regarding bioavailability, suitability and stability. These formulations must be prepared from pure active substance and not from commercially available dosage forms. The development of paediatric formulations, particularly those suitable for very young children, can be a challenge to pharmacists. There is limited knowledge available about the acceptability of different dosage forms, administration volume, dosage form size, taste, safety of formulation excipients regarding to age and development status. The selection of formulation and route of administration depends on the disease being treated and the clinical condition. European Guidelines and reflection papers recommend that pharmaceutical development should consider some parameters like capability, acute or long-term illness, caregiver convenience, disability, culture differences and formulations more attractive to children must be explored.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

The Impact of Adenotonsillectomy on Health-Related Quality of Life in Paediatric Patients

Published on: 25th September, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7900079688

Objective: To determine the impact of Adenotonsillectomy on Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children’s before and after surgery. Study Design: Prospective, Observational, before and after the trial. 142 children who underwent Adenotonsillectomy were included in the study. Parents were made to fill pre and post-operative questionnaires which were customized from Tonsil and Adenoid health status instrument (TAHSI) and HR-QoL (Health-related quality of life) forms, one day prior to the surgery and 6 months after the surgery respectively, and the results were tabulated and analyzed. Setting: Tertiary pediatric otolaryngology practices. Result: Out of the 142 children in the study, 80 were male and 62 were female. Male to Female ratio is 1.3:1. Age group 1-4 years had the highest number of patients while the age group 9-12 had the least. Preoperatively the Mean score of the domain for Sleep disturbances, Physical Symptoms, Emotional distress, Daytime functions, and Caregiver concern was 14.1, 15.83, 6.89, 7.54, and 13.78 respectively. After 6 months of the surgery, the score decreased to 4.65, 4.22, 4.32, 3.1 and 4.2 respectively. This shows a significant improvement in the symptom complex and the quality of the life. Conclusion: Adenotonsillectomy definitely leads to an improvement in the HRQoL in children as the majority of parents were extremely satisfied with the surgical outcome. Almost all of the parents reported a decrease in Sleep disturbances, Physical Symptoms, Emotional distress, Daytime functions, and Caregiver concern
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Factors associated with zinc prescription practice among children with diarrhea who visited public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A cross sectional study

Published on: 25th March, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8984625020

Background: Diarrhea and nutrient deficiency worsen each other, and zinc is recommended to be included in clinical management of diarrhea. Therefore, this investigation was done to assess zinc prescription practice to children with diarrhea, identify factors associated with zinc prescription, and assess caregivers’ zinc’s perceived cost and willingness to pay for. Methods: A health institution based cross-sectional study was done. Caretakers of 609 children with diarrhea attending health centers in Addis Ababa were included. Logistic regression was applied to identify variables associated with zinc prescription. Results: Zinc was prescribed to 62.1% of children. About 74.9% of the caregivers were willing to pay for zinc. Previous use of zinc (AOR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.34-4.01), exposure to zinc related message (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.53-4.60) and willingness to pay for zinc (AOR = 6.9; 95% CI: 3.84-12.66) were associated with zinc prescription. Conclusion: Zinc was not administered to considerable proportion of children with diarrhea. Previous use of zinc, exposure to zinc related message and willingness to pay for positively contributed to zinc prescription. Health care workers shall be encouraged on zinc prescription. Intervention to increase willingness to pay for zinc and zinc benefit communication shall be strengthened in parallel with operational researches.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Associations of adverse social determinants of health with missed well-child visits and the role of caregiver social support

Published on: 2nd August, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9157822217

Objective: To examine the association between adverse social determinants of health (SDH) and missed well-child visits and the interaction with the level of caregiver social support. Methods: This is a secondary data analysis of data collected from a SDH screening program conducted during well-child visits with referral, navigation and follow-up services for patients. We included 573 adult caregivers who accompanied patients aged 0-5 years to well-child visits and completed the screening from August 2017 to May 2018. The caregivers reported financial hardship, food insecurity, housing challenges, childcare difficulty, transportation issues, insurance difficulty, job difficulty, and education needs. Our primary outcome was a no-show (i.e., missed) to a well-child visit. Social support was dichotomized as low or high. Results: Among 573 patients who completed the screening, 335 patients (76.4%) had at least one social need. Financial hardship (p = 0.006), housing instability (p = 0.002), and no/poor childcare (p = 0.03) were associated with missed well-child visits. In multivariable regression analysis, having Medicaid (aOR = 1.91 [1.17-3.10]) and unstable housing (aOR = 6.79 [1.35-34.70]) were both associated with missed well-child visits. However, when social support was added to the multivariable logistic model, both Medicaid and unstable housing were no longer associated with missed well-child visits. Conclusion: Adverse SDH such as financial hardship, housing instability, and childcare difficulty were associated with missed well-child visits. However, with the addition of social support, this association was no longer significant. This study supports the hypothesis that high social support may mitigate the association between well-child visits among families experiencing adverse SDH.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Dealing with Depression in Family Caregivers

Published on: 27th March, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317595274

Aims and objectives: By reporting the use of therapeutic nursing interventions to facilitate the process of change in a depressive elderly caregiver, this paper seeks to underline the importance of fitting interventions to individual clients. Background: In assisting families of chronic illness sufferers, it must be remembered that the perceptions and functions of both clients and families are determined by family members, and that changes, if any, are made by those clients and families, rather than by nurses. However, nurses do play an important role in facilitating the process of change. Design: This is a case report. Methods: A case study of a depressive elderly caregiver is used to examine the use of therapeutic nursing interventions to facilitate the process of change with problem analysis, case conceptualisation and specific skills employed documented. Results: The change from one therapeutic approach (Cognitive-behavioural therapy) to another (Narrative Therapy) facilitates enlisting the caregiver’s unique strengths, resources and competence to overcome the difficulties and challenges identified during the process of change. In dealing with depression in family caregivers, nurses should not only be flexible but also remain sceptical in using different approaches, with heightened awareness of the client’s circumstances.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Caring Difficulties of Parents’ Towards Children with Cerebral Palsy

Published on: 16th May, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317593954

Children with cerebral palsy may have one or more of mental, psychomotor, visual, audio or speech problems. Not being a well-defined disease with clear boundaries, it is regarded as a set of conditions caused by various reasons. In this regard, children with CP have to depend on their families or caregivers and cope with physical, mental, social and economic problems due to their condition. Therefore, it turns out to be crucial to determine the needs of the family with children with CP so that the programs that will assist them during this process can be developed. The study further revealed that the parents of the children with cerebral palsy needed information about controlling their children’s behaviors and teaching them certain behaviors; they needed to talk to the teacher and/or therapist of the child; they needed support about making time for themselves; they needed community services about finding a care center or a nursery suitable for their children’s needs.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Perceived causes and prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections among spinal cord injured patients

Published on: 27th November, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9272371774

Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is among the most common nosocomial infections especially in acute care settings. Its economic and unanticipated health implications make it burdensome for the healthcare providers and patients. The paper examined the perceived causes and mode of preventing urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord injury. Qualitative research approach was utilized; the study site was a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria. Eight (8) in-depth interviews (IDI) were conducted with healthcare providers managing patients with spinal cord injured in the hospital. The major risk factors causing urinary tract infection identified include financial problems, organization of care, human error, hospital environment and patient-related factors. To prevent urinary tract infections among patients in the hospital, a number of suggestions were made by the participants such as training of caregivers and educating patients and relations. The authors concluded that the incidence of CAUTI could be reduced in the hospital if the opinions of stakeholders are fairly considered.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Factors of the grandparent conditions to take care of a child born accidentally in environmental health through their raising sexuality adolescence behaviours toward their abusing and neglecting from teenage parents

Published on: 10th September, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9252207194

According to raising teenage parents though their abusing and neglecting children at a rural community with the ethnographic qualitative research method was surveyed. All children have protected on violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation from their teenage parents. To investigate and emphasize the consequences of violence ranged from immediate to the impact of their development on physical injury, learning ability, and local child care performance to long-term harm that caregivers carry into adult life is affected for raising children. Administration to the 89-households’ families and household memberships, 10 house stakeholders, 8 community leaders, 36 children, 65 caregivers, teenage parents and grandparents, and 3 mentors. Using the ethnographic qualitative research participatory with observation, natural conversation and in-depth interviews were randomized in rural Northeastern Region, Thailand. There are 52% of children being sexually, physically, or psychologically abused, neglected per day. Most of the teenagers’ education is poor learning skills, low academic learning achievements, and independent freedom of their sexual behaviors. These sexual intercourses between their groups are normal. Adding gambling habits among friends and adult groups are amputated without parents to dissuade. Either lifestyles as freely with sexually and gambling and the basic education are stopped, experiences’ living skills are poorly. Teenage women are changed to pregnant and young mothers. The teenage men must be searched for the job without a lack of worker’s skills to look for children with whom they are conflicted family relationships to take care.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Developmentally appropriate practices on knowledge skills for contributing child’s intelligences of receptive language skills in appropriate and inappropriate early childhoods

Published on: 10th September, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9252226608

To investigate the variables correlation analysis research method for assessing the caregivers’ perceptions in two groups including dependent and independent variables to correlate the measuring of early childhoods. Typically, in correlated data, for jointly normally distributed data with relevant outliers that can use a correlation as a measure of a monotonic association. Designing the 65-paired samples for the Thai Model of early detection and intervention of children as the health care system guidelines from 26-CUPs have compared. Using the DSPM divided into 65-appropriate and 65-inappropriate development early childhoods for every 13 CUPS that depends on talented children. Selecting the Receptive Language (RL) skills identified in contributing growth relative factors with four research instruments: the EPRLS, PRLF, CNRLF, and CMRLF are valid and reliable significantly. Comparisons of the appropriate and inappropriate early childhoods are differences ( < .05), the intercorrelation circumflex nature analysis (p < .05), positively. The R2 values show that 26% and 55% of the variance in training caregivers’ factor skills on the PRLF, CNRLF, and CMRLF to the EPRLS in inappropriate and appropriate early childhoods, respectively. Developmentally Appropriate Practice is a perspective in a child’s development: social, emotional, physical, and cognitive-based on the child’s cultural background: community, family history, and family structure.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Associated indicator factors among inappropriate malfunctions’ development for the 9-month-old-baby

Published on: 10th September, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9252205593

To investigate the associated an inappropriate development of the 9-month-old-baby with the Matched Case-Control Study on five categories and three factors including predisposing, contributing, and complementary through the babies’ malfunction development with the Analysis Research Method was analyzed. The babies’ developing crisis was enhanced as the guidelines for promoting healthy babies’ development via the DSPM in the future of Thailand. Creative the Interview Factor Questionnaire analyzed the 130-child caregivers’ parenting matching 65-pairs-case-control group into 5 parts: the Predisposing Factor Questionnaire, the Positive Interview Form; the Baby-Self-Efficacy Form; the Inappropriate Contributing Interview Form; the Inappropriate Development Interview Form for assessing the motor skills, self-efficacy, predisposing, contributing, and complementary factors of the 9-month-old-baby, respectively. Highest, Middle, and Lowest means levels are indicated. The child caregivers’ are presenting responses, overall on the Predisposing Factor Questionnaire on five categories’ motor skills, and the Inappropriate Development Interview Form showed off at the Middle Levels. The Positive Interview Form, the Baby-Self-Efficacy Form, and the Inappropriate Contributing Interview Form comprised at the Highest Levels for the predisposing, self-efficacy, and contributing factors for developing the 9-month-old-baby, respectively. To help professionals assess the factors affecting a child’s development into environmental factors, biological factors, interpersonal relationships, and early environments and experiences that identified in contributing to growth, brain, emotional, social developments at early childhood are the GM, FM, RL, EL, and PS motor skills practices with the DSPM for Thai’s children are also more likely to have health problems all child ages with the knowledge and skills.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Identity-related attitude in the child development centres for protecting educational asylum of early childhoods: From rural communities to schooling cities

Published on: 13th September, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9252227524

The global identities of parents’ popularity in rural communities to make-decision effects of their attitudes to transfer their Early Childhood from Child Development Centres and Local Primary School for moving study into the schooling cities that looks like children’ asylum of their educational conditions, problems, administration’ school directors, teachers, and schools’ environments to protect that described. The involving CDCs’ perceptions got using the 25-item My CDC Identity Inventory (MCDCII) in five scales, three options. Teacher and Caregiver-Early Childhood interactions have assessed with the 30-item Questionnaires on Teacher Identity Interaction (QTII) in five scales on five options. The 10-item Local Identity-Related Attitude (LIRA) has been associated with a sample of 300 children’s parents, teachers, and caregivers. The determination of efficient predictive value (R2) shows that 30% of accepted the identities on cohesiveness, competitiveness, physical indoor and outdoor environmental development, satisfaction, and strong-sense identity. 74% of their CDCs can protect the educational asylum of early childhoods from rural communities. The R2 value shows 49% of the variance in children’s parents’ perceptions was because of the MCDCII have associated. Despite Thailand’s success in expanding educational access, new empirical evidence suggests that much more needs to be done to maximize the potential of its students. The performance gaps among schools have disadvantaged and poorer-performing students have concentrated in small rural village schools. The Thai pre-primary school system is dramatically lacking in qualified the CDCs’ learning environments and achievements, and teachers. It allocated small rural schools teachers with lower qualifications and teaching experience.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

The role of denial on emotional correlates of childhood trauma in a non-clinical population

Published on: 30th November, 2022

Background: A large body of evidence suggests that child abuse and neglect by a caregiver is a recurrent event linked to increased psychopathology symptoms. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is commonly used to assess abuse/neglect during childhood. However, even though the Minimization-Denial (MD) subscale was originally designed to assess response bias (i.e., underreporting of childhood maltreatment), it is possible that the scale may reflect coping strategies that play an effective role in the relationship between childhood trauma and their negative outcomes. Also, even though MD has been associated with decreased psychopathology symptoms, it is also strongly associated with other scales of the CTQ. Method: This study (n = 133) examined whether (1) the MD-scale is negatively associated with alexithymia, emotion dysregulation and psychopathology, if (2) these associations will hold when adjusting for different subtypes of abuse and neglect and (3) and the role of MD as a possible moderator in these relationships. Results: The analyses showed that, although MD scores have relatively strong and (mostly) significant (negative) associations with the CTQ, emotion dysregulation strategies and psychopathology symptoms, these associations were weak and failed to remain significant when adjusting for the effect of CTQ. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the MD scores should be viewed as an accurate reflection of the absence (or little) of exposure to childhood abuse/neglect. 
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Quality of life in Ghanaian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus compared with non diabetic controls and caregivers’ report

Published on: 30th March, 2023

Background: Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is as important as metabolic control in the management and prevention of diabetes-related complications. Aim: To describe the self-reported HRQOL outcomes in Ghanaian children and adolescents with T1DM compared with healthy controls and perceived HRQOL by caregivers.Setting: Out-patient clinics of the Departments of Child Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, Family Medicine, and Ophthalmology, the National Diabetes Management and Research Centre (all at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital), and the Cape Coast Teaching Hospital (CCTH).Methods: Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of study participants were documented. Participants completed the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales. Data analysis was done with SPSS Version 25.0. An unpaired t-test was used in comparing the HRQOL scores between children and adolescents with T1DM and controls, and parental proxy reports. Results: Fifty children and adolescents with T1DM, 50 parents/caregivers, and 80 healthy non-diabetic controls took part in this study. There was no significant difference in mean score between the patients and the caregivers for overall HRQOL (p = 0.270). Patients reported significantly worse overall HRQOL than their controls (p = 0.001). Males with diabetes reported better HRQOL than females (p = 0.007). Conclusion: Children and adolescents with T1DM and their parents/caregivers reported lower HRQOL scores compared to healthy controls. Males reported better HRQOL than females. Potential implications: HRQOL should be routinely assessed together with proxy reports from parents to identify those who might benefit from further attention including referral to a psychologist.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Harnessing Artificial Intelligence for Early and Evolution of Alzheimer’s Disease Detections and Enhancing Senior Mental Health through Innovative Art-Singing Therapies: A Multidisciplinary Approach

Published on: 28th June, 2023

The well-documented therapeutic potential of group singing for patients living with Alzheimer’s disease (PLAD) has been hindered by COVID-19 restrictions, exacerbating loneliness and cognitive decline among seniors in residential and long-term care centers (CHSLDs). Addressing this challenge, the multidisciplinary study aims to develop a patient-oriented virtual reality (XR) interaction system facilitating group singing for mental health support during confinement and enhancing the understanding of the links between Alzheimer’s disease, social interaction, and singing. The researchers also propose to establish an early AD detection system using voice, facial, and non-invasive biometric measurements and validate the efficacy of selected intervention practices. The methodology involves co-designing an intelligent environment with caregivers to support PLAD mental health through online group singing, addressing existing constraints in CHSLDs. The researchers will engage volunteers in remote singing interactions and validate the impact of voice stimulation for PLADs using a control group. The primary expected outcome is the development of an “Intelligent Learning Health Environment,” fostering interactions while adapting to individual PLAD situations and incrementally accumulating knowledge on AD signs. This environment will facilitate the transfer of knowledge and technologies to promote non-verbal interactions via singing, enabling intervention at the first symptoms. Additionally, the research will contribute to transforming CHSLDs’ living environments, informed by neuroscience insights, and potentially extend the “collaborative self-care” approach to support seniors in aging safely and healthily at home.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Internet Addiction and its Relationship with Attachment Styles Among Tunisian Medical Students

Published on: 13th July, 2023

Internet addiction is a growing addictive behavior and a major public health problem worldwide. Several psychological factors can contribute to the problematic use of the Internet. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Internet Addiction (IA) in a sample of university students and to examine the relationship between IA, self-esteem, and attachment styles.The present study was a cross-sectional study, involving 135 students from the Faculty of Medicine of Monastir. The participants completed a questionnaire, which contained the socio-demographic data, the reasons for Internet use, the Young Cyberaddiction scale to seek IA, the Relationships-style-questionnaire-RSQ to assess attachment style, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES).The mean age of the students was 21.5 ± 1.9 years old. They were 112 (83%) females. The prevalence of Internet addiction was 23.7%. The average connection time was 3.5 ± 1.8 hours/day. The most frequent online activities were chat (online discussion, forums ...) in 94.8% of cases followed by download activities (78.5%), scientific research (75.6%), online games (23.7%), and online shopping (13.3%). IA was associated with school failure, alcohol use, online gaming, and low self-esteem. The majority of the participants (84.4%) in this study reported an insecure attachment style. Logistic regression analysis showed a strong association between IA and fearful attachment style.IA was frequent among students. Fearful attachment style was found to be a risk factor for IA. This study highlights the impact of relationships between child and their caregivers on the development of addiction.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

A-Z Journals

Help ?

HSPI: We're glad you're here. Please click "create a new Query" if you are a new visitor to our website and need further information from us.

If you are already a member of our network and need to keep track of any developments regarding a question you have already submitted, click "take me to my Query."