Chlorophyll

Demystifying the power of magnesium

Published on: 29th May, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8874832459

Epsom salts was inadvertently discovered in Epson spring in England and used as magnesium salt in 1697. It is simply the magnesium sulphate, a commonly used ingredient in beauty and wellness kiosks for soothing joints, muscles and mind. Richard Martin Willstatter working on plant pigments begged a Nobel Prize in 1915 for his discovery of chlorophyll containing magnesium. The magnesium holds the centre position in chlorophyll in a manner as iron in hemoglobin.
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How Bruguiera gymnorhizza seedlings respond to climate change induced salinity rise?

Published on: 22nd September, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286422995

A study was undertaken during August 2017 to evaluate the effect of salinity on chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll, and carotenoid and proline contents of hydroponically grown seedlings of Bruguiera gymnorhizza. The primary aim was to observe its tolerance to changing salinity. The selected seedlings were exposed to five different salinity levels (2,5,10,15 and 20psu) for a period of 30 days and observations were done at a regular interval of 7,14,21 and 30 days respectively. The concentrations of chlorophyll exhibited significant positive correlations with salinity (p<0.01). The chlorophyll a:b ratio in the plant varied between 2.39 to 3.71 throughout the period of investigation. The salinity fluctuation did not affect the carotenoid level and proline content in the leaves of the species as evidenced from the insignificant r values. The results show that Bruguiera gymnorhizza of Indian Sundarbans region can tolerate and adapt to high saline condition as witnessed in the central sector of the deltaic complex around the Matla River.
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Chlorophylls and xanthophylls of crop plants as dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC)

Published on: 11th October, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286354251

Natural dyes have become a viable alternative to expensive and rare organic sensitizers because of their low cost, easy attainability, abundance of supply of raw materials and environmental friendliness. Chlorophyll, the most abundant pigment, can be extracted from plant leaves with simple and inexpensive methods, but it’s difficult to use as a Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) sensitizer due to the absence of OH and COOH groups. The opposite is true for xanthophylls, a particular class of carotenoids that contain free hydroxyl groups and thus may be considered as potential DSSC sensitizers. In this work we describe a new and inexpensive method of chlorophyll extraction from leaves based on the use of a basic solvent that provides the creation of COOH groups, allowing chlorophyll binding on the TiO2 layer. This modified chlorophyll dye showed a higher DSSC efficiency level (0.72%) compared to xanthophylls, which had lower efficiency.
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