Orgasm

Orgasmic coitus triggered stillbirth via placental abruption: A case report

Published on: 23rd December, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8495684427

Sexual activity during healthy pregnancy is safe. There are little data on how coital activity affects outcome of the high-risk pregnancies. Hereby we report a case demonstrating that orgasmic coitus triggered placental abruption resulting in preterm stillbirth. A 38-year-old 8-para, 12-gravida woman lived unmarriedly with a constant partner in low socioeconomic conditions. Her previous pregnancies included 7 deliveries without complication, two early miscarriages and two pregnancy terminations. Her present pregnancy was complicated with gestational hypertension successfully treated with nifedipine. She had coitus 2 to 4 times a month, mostly without orgasm. The last coitus which happened in side-by-side position was accompanied by orgasm which continued in uterine hypertonicity and massive vaginal bleeding at 29 weeks gestation. Two hours subsequently, on admission to hospital, placental abruption and fetal demise were diagnosed. At the emergency cesarean section, a dead female infant weighing 1,510 g was born. Fetal pathology was not discovered. Placental histopathology showed retroplacental hematoma, intervillous and decidual hemorrhages, focal distal villous hypoplasia and avascular villuses. Patient’s recovery rapidly occurred after intensive care. Placental abruption complicates 0.4% - 1.0% of deliveries. It is known that most cases of abruption cannot be predicted and prevented. Our report suggests that orgasmic coitus may be a trigger for placental abruption in those women who have gestational hypertension and multiple risks for placental abruption. We infer from the above case that sexual intercourse is advised to avoid during pregnancy of such women in order to prevent placental abruption.
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The role of cognitive distraction in sexual dysfunction in female medical resident doctors

Published on: 31st May, 2022

Introduction: Studies have shown a high prevalence of sexual dysfunction in Medical residents. Psychological, interpersonal, and sociocultural factors play an important role in sexual vulnerability. In addition, distraction or interference in the cognitive process of the erotic stimulus plays an important role in the development of sexual dysfunction. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions among a sample of married female medical resident doctors and to explore its relation with cognitive distraction during sex.Subjects and methods: This was a cross-sectional study, which was carried out in October 2017 with 70 married female medical resident doctors. We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) for sexual functioning assessment and the cognitive distraction during sex scale. Results: The mean age of women was 30.52 years. They had been married for 6.04 years on the mean. The majority (74%) had children. According to the FSFI, 40% of resident doctors had sexual dysfunction. The mean cognitive distraction during sex score was 4.37.In our study, women with female sexual dysfunction reported significantly lower sexual desire score = 3.2 vs. 4.1 and p = 0.03) and arousal (score = 3.è vs. 4.7 and p = 10-3), decreased lubrication (score = 3.8 vs. 5.1; p = 10-3), less sexual satisfaction (score = 3.9 vs. 5.8; p = 10-3)and higher orgasm difficulties (score = 3.4 vs. 5.1; p = 10-3). Yet, our results highlighted that women with female sexual dysfunction presented significantly more cognitive distraction during sex (score = 3.9 vs. 4.6; p = 0.03). Conclusion: According to our study, it appears that the prevalence of FSD in medical resident doctors is considerable. Besides, intrusive thoughts and cognitive distraction during sexual intercourse are importantly associated with sexual functioning. Therefore, several measures should be implemented in this population to prevent or act on these factors.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat