Panic

Embolic Septic Emboli with MRSA: A different source

Published on: 12th December, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9272395614

Septic Iliac vein thrombophlebitis with associated psoas abscess is a rare and severe entity, which diagnosis is challenging when no risk factor is clearly present. We are presenting a case of severe septic cavitary pulmonary emboli complicated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) that evolved rapidly to respiratory distress and multi organ failure. A 61-year-old Hispanic male, had multiple emergency department visits due to back pain, being most of them intramuscular pain medications and steroids. In the history, he had back pain that worsened accompanied by poor mobility, generalized malaise, fever and chills. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed a paravertebral psoas abscess with L5 - S1 diskitis/spondylitis inflammatory changes, which was then later evidenced by a gallium study. Further imaging studies were done, showed bilateral cavitary lung lesions, consistent with septic emboli. Subsequent blood cultures were positive for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA), for which a successful combined therapeutic regimen was used. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram were not suggestive of endocarditis. Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacteremia is one of the most common serious bacterial infections with a high risk of metastatic complications, which makes this pathogen a unique one. The combination of factors iliac vein thrombophlebitis, psoas muscle abscess, diskitis/spondylitis with ARDS makes cavitary pulmonary disease a challenging perspective. After a 6-week antimicrobial treatment, full anticoagulation, his clinical condition and image findings improved, and he was recently admitted for physical rehabilitation. Major vessels thrombophlebitis should always be considered, when primary source of septic pulmonary emboli is not clear. This case illustrates the complexity of illness and complications that may arise from a source of infection as the one in this patient. Further therapeutic strategies were tailored accordingly.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

An exceptional case of bilateral vestibular areflexia complicating acute otitis media

Published on: 2nd July, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8627247898

Introduction: Bilateral vestibular areflexia is a rare pathological entity whose most frequent etiology is drug ototoxicity. We report an unusual case of bilateral vestibular areflexia complicating acute otitis media through which we raise the difficulties of diagnosis and therapeutic management of this pathology. Case Report: 57-year-old Tunisian patient who consults for a loss balance associated with earache and hearing loss. Initial clinical examination revealed bilateral acute otitis media with a right harmonious vestibular syndrome and normal neurological examination. The diagnosis of post-otitis labyrinthitis was retained. The patient was put on antibiotics and corticosteroids. The evolution was marked by the persistence of instability in darkness and oscillopsia; vestibular explorations concluded with bilateral vestibular areflexia. MRI concluded to posterior labyrinthitis and eliminated central neurological involvement. The patient was kept under betahistine. The tympanic cavity was drained by a tympanic aerator on both sides. Vestibular rehabilitation was started quickly. Gradual improvement was obtained of autonomy with persistent oscillopsia. Conclusion: Bilateral vestibular areflexia poses diagnostic problems based on anamnestic and clinical arguments and vestibular explorations. The therapeutic management is delicate, vestibular reeducation occupies a primordial place.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Perinuclear halo indicate Trichomonas vaginalis in Pap smear

Published on: 11th January, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7986007615

Trichomonas vaginalis could be seen in Pap smears where it is reported, but because main concerned is placed on malignant cells in Pap smears, not much effort is done to search for this parasite in smears. In this study, 100 cervical and vaginal specimens were examined microscopically by the conventional Papanicolaou method and liquid base cytology (LBC) for the presence of Trichomonas vaginalis (T.vaginalis). 16% were infected with T.vaginalis while 10% of diagnosis based on both perinuclear halo and T. vaginalis presence although the association between perinuclear halo and T, vaginalis is statistically insignificant it is recommended to increase the number of the cases to prove or disprove the association
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Statistical and equation model analysis on COVID-19

Published on: 3rd July, 2020

Background: An infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus called COVID-19 has raged across the world since December 2019. The novel coronavirus first appeared in Wuhan, China, and quickly spread to Asia and now many countries around the world are affected by the epidemic. The deaths of many patients, including medical staff, caused social panic, media attention, and high attention from governments and world organizations. Today, with the joint efforts of the government, the doctors and all walks of life, the epidemic in Hubei Province has been brought under control, preventing its spread from affecting the lives of the people. Because of its rapid spread and serious consequences, this sudden novel coronary pneumonia epidemic has become an important social hot spot event. Through the analysis of the novel coronary pneumonia epidemic situation, we can also have a better understanding of sudden infectious diseases in the future, so that we can take more effective response measures, establish a truly predictable and provide reliable and sufficient information for prevention and control model. Methods: We establish different models according to the different developments of the epidemic situation, different time points, and different response measures taken by the government. To be specific, during the period of 2020.1.23-2020.2.7, the traditional SIR model is adopted; during the period of 2020.2.8-2020.3.30, according to the scientific research results, it was considered that the novel coronary pneumonia has a latent period, so in the later phase of epidemic development, the government has effectively isolated patients, thus we adopt the SEIQR model accordingly. During the period of 2020.3.31-2020.5.16, because more asymptomatic infected people were found, we use the SEIQLR model to fit. Finally, through a SEIR simulator, considering the susceptible number, the latent number, the infected number, the cured number, death number and other factors, we simulate the change of various numbers of people from the beginning to the next 180 days of novel coronary pneumonia. Findings: The results based on the analysis of differential equations and kinetic models show that through the prediction of the model established in the first phase, the epidemic situation of novel coronary pneumonia in Hubei Province was controlled at the end of March, which is in line with the actual situation. The rest of Hubei province, except for Wuhan, lifted control of the departure channel from 0:00 am on March 25, and Wuhan was also unblocked on April 8. Through the establishment of the second-phase model, it is found that the epidemic situation will reach its peak in mid-February. For example, the quarantine admission of the hospital declined after mid-February, which is inseparable from the measures to build square cabin hospitals in early February so that more and more patients can be admitted. The model established in the third phase shows that the epidemic had been completely controlled by the end of May, which is also in line with the reality. Because in mid-May, the Wuhan government conducted a nucleic acid test on all the citizens to screen for asymptomatic infected persons to fundamentally control the spread of novel coronary pneumonia. Interpretation: Hubei Province, as the center of the initial outbreak of novel coronary pneumonia, people were forced to be isolated at home during the Spring Festival, the most important Chinese holiday, and the whole society was in a state of suspension of work and study. The Chinese government had taken many measures in response to the epidemic, such as shutting down the city, vigorously building square cabin hospitals, and prohibiting people from gathering. At the beginning of May this year, the epidemic in Hubei Province was finally effectively controlled. For ordinary citizens, we should not cause unnecessary panic about the unknown novel coronavirus. Instead, we should fully understand and be familiar with this virus. In addition to the relevant medical knowledge, we should also understand the spread of infectious diseases through appropriate mathematical models. By mathematical models, we can understand the degree of harm of infectious diseases, when to control it, how to stop it, and use scientific views to reveal the original face of the novel coronavirus to the public without causing social panic.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Acute Appendicitis: Hispanics and the Hamburger Sign

Published on: 20th November, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8405001290

Objective: To describe the presenting clinical findings of patients with acute appendicitis and compare them with those described in the medical literature. To corroborate a common medical myth among Hispanic physicians regarding the presentation of acute appendicitis. Methods: This was a retrospective multicenter chart review of patients diagnosed post-operatively with appendicitis after presenting to five different Emergency Departments in Southern Puerto Rico (PR). Results: A total of 1,540 patients with pathologically confirmed cases of appendicitis were enrolled in our study. Of the study population, 45% were female, and 55% were male, and 43% were over 21 years old. Reported symptoms in our study showed that 98% of the patients had abdominal pain, 47% had nausea, and only 17.6% presented with anorexia. Conclusion: It was our main objective to compare the presenting signs and symptoms of patients with acute appendicitis in our Hispanic population in southern PR with those found in primary medical textbooks and literature. We gathered information regarding signs and symptoms, as well as laboratory and radiographic data of patients with positive pathologic exams for appendicitis. Of the 1,540 patients with confirmed appendicitis, only 17.6% presented with anorexia. Our findings demonstrate that the rate of anorexia in the studied population is significantly lower when compared to current literature. The absence of anorexia, once considered a hallmark of appendicitis, must not lead the physician to rule out this diagnosis in the Hispanic population.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Gene polymorphisms CVPDr on some plants citrus in Bali Island

Published on: 7th May, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8604563550

Citrus Vein Phloem Degeneration (CVPD) is the main disease of citrus plants in Indonesia. This disease is caused by Gram negative bacteria, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Almost all citrus plants are susceptible to this disease and only a few citrus plants such as seedless lime (Citrus aurantiifolia var. Seedles) and kinkit citrus (Triphacia trifoliate) are tolerant. Both of these citrus plants store DNA fragments of CVPDr which are considered as tolerant factors (841 bp). However, this study found that CVPDr DNA fragments were also found in citrus plants susceptible to CVPD disease. This research aims to study DNA polymorphisms from CVPDr DNA fragments in citrus plants on the island of Bali. The PCR test showed T. trifoliate and C. aurantifolia that are resistant to CVPD and Pylogenically are in the same group as C. nobilis var Buleleng, C. reticulate var. Slayer Buleleng, and C. amblicarpa. On the other hand, citrus plants susceptible to CVPD are in a different group. There are two types of citrus plants not containing CVPDr DNA fragments, namely C. nobilis var. Petang and M. paniculata L. These results indicate that the CVPDr DNA fragment polymorphism is a factor tolerant to CVPD disease.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Transcanal Endoscopic Excision of Glomus Tympanicum in can tho Ent Hospital: Three Cases Report

Published on: 13th July, 2023

Glomus tympanicum (GT) is a highly vascular, benign, and slow-growing tumor of the middle ear. It can be confused with other common ear diseases such as acute middle ear infection, otitis media with effusion, ear trauma… It is accurately diagnosed by history and endoscopy. CT scan showing: the presence of eroding jugular bulb is the most important thing to distinguish glomus tympanicum and glomus jugulare and assess the extension of the tumor to make good surgical planning. We present here the three cases in Can Tho ENT hospital: where total excisions were achieved trans-canal endoscopically without embolization. These procedures were safe, quick, and effective due to the better visualization of the surgical field with the endoscope.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Evaluation of a Weight-Based Mycophenolate Mofetil Dosing Protocol for Kidney Transplant Maintenance Immunosuppression

Published on: 28th July, 2023

To evaluate the safety and efficacy of weight-based mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) dosing in adult kidney transplant recipients (KTR), this single-center retrospective study of adult KTR compared biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR), infections, hospitalizations, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) use, and MMF dose changes within one year of transplant pre-and post-implementation of a weight-based MMF dosing protocol. Adult patients who received a kidney transplant at University Health Transplant Institute were reviewed for inclusion. Patients in the weight-based MMF group received 1000 mg twice daily by the first clinic visit if ≥ 80 kg, 750 mg twice daily if 50-79 kg, and 500 mg twice daily if < 50 kg. Patients in the fixed-dose MMF group received MMF 1000 mg twice daily. A total of 170 KTR (50.0% ≥ 80 kg, 44.1% 50-79 kg, 5.9% < 50 kg) were included. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. The majority of patients were middle-aged Hispanic males and received lymphocyte-depleting induction therapy. Incidences of BPAR, infection, and hospitalization were similar between both groups at one-year post-transplant. Weight-based MMF dosing is safe and effective in adult KTR.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Causal Mediation Analysis for Childhood Cancer Survival Disparity in Texas, 2005 to 2014

Published on: 29th March, 2024

This study aimed to examine the disparities of childhood cancer survival among different racial and ethnic groups in Texas. The analysis was mediated by socioeconomic status (SES) and spatial accessibility to Children Oncology Group (COG) hospitals. The relationship between race-ethnicity and overall survival was measured using the Cox proportional hazards model with a robust variance estimator. The counterfactual model measures the total effect of race-ethnicity on survival through all mediating pathways while adjusting for baseline confounders (age, sex, and stage at diagnosis), which are then decomposed into natural direct and indirect effects. Considering all cancer site groups, African Americans showed a statistically significant higher hazard ratio in death (HR = 3.63; 95% CI = 1.87 - 6.62) compared with non-Hispanic White children. At the same time, the mortality hazard ratio among Hispanic children is not significant (HR = 1.23; 95% CI = 0.80 - 1.93) when compared with non-Hispanic White children. Analysis results also suggested that both mediators significantly contribute to racial-ethnic survival disparities for specific cancer site groups such as Leukemia for African American children. This study builds knowledge and understanding about underlying factors (mediators) responsible for the disparities in the outcomes among childhood cancer patients.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Breast Cancer in Female

Published on: 22nd April, 2024

Anxiety is also a very common disorder, both in patients and their family members. Anxiety and stress can compromise the quality of life of cancer patients and their families. Feelings of anxiety and anguish can occur at various times of the disease path: during screening, waiting for test results, at diagnosis, during treatment or at the next stage due to concern about relapses. Anxiety and distress can affect the patient’s ability to cope with diagnosis or treatment, frequently causing reduced adherence to follow-up visits and examinations, indirectly increasing the risk of failure to detect a relapse, or a delay in treatment; and anxiety can increase the perception of pain, affect sleep, and accentuate nausea due to adjuvant therapies. Failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression in the context of cancer increases the risk of poor quality of life and potentially results in increased disease-related morbidity and mortality [1]. From all this we deduce the need and importance of dedicated psychological and psychiatric support for these patients within the Breast Unit. The fact that the psycho-oncologist who is dedicated to the care of patients with breast cancer must be an integrated figure in the multidisciplinary team of the Senological Center and not an external consultant is enshrined in the same European Directives that concern the legislation concerning the requirements that a Breast Unit must have in order to be considered a Full Breast Unit (Wilson AMR, et al. 2013).One of the most complex situations you find yourself dealing with is communication with the patient. This communication is particularly complex in two fragile subpopulations that are represented by women. [Menditto L. T (Tirannie) Cancer of the Breast. Am J Psychol & Brain Stud, 2023; 1(1):26-30].
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Complications of External Otitis in Horses

Published on: 21st May, 2024

The physiological removal of foreign bodies in the horse’s external ear canal is best achieved by head-shaking. However, external otitis in the horse induces moderate to severe pain: therefore, the horse does not shake his head. The causes of external otitis are dust, water in the external ear canal, keratin, and ceruminous debris. The clinical symptoms are ear discharge, skittishness, facial nerve paresis, and/or head tilt. After the horse has been sedated, the most important diagnostic procedure is the endoscopy of the cartilaginous and osseous part of the external ear canal, including the evaluation of the transparency of the tympanic membrane. The clinical complications of external otitis are hearing loss, facial nerve paresis, head tilt, hypertrophy of the tympanostylohyoideum, and corneal ulcers. The most important treatment is soaking up the exudate in the osseous part of the external ear canal using small cotton balls which are held by the foreign body forceps of the endoscope. Based on the results of the culture of exudate and the antibiogram, an antibacterial drug must be administered orally for 3 to 4 weeks. At this time, an endoscopy of the external ear canals and guttural pouches also has to be done. Based on the outcome of the endoscopy, endoscopic and clinical investigations have to be performed six months later as well. Only 7/19 horses had a normal osseous part of the external ear canal with a transparent tympanic membrane, including normal hearing measured by the brainstem auditory-evoked response after one month of treatment.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat
Help ?

HSPI: We're glad you're here. Please click "create a new Query" if you are a new visitor to our website and need further information from us.

If you are already a member of our network and need to keep track of any developments regarding a question you have already submitted, click "take me to my Query."