Psoriasis

Opera-glass hand with arthritis mutilans in psoriatic arthritis

Published on: 28th May, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8605993421

A 42 years old gentleman who was a known case of Psoriasis vulgaris since last 5 years presented to the Rheumatology clinic with inflammatory arthritis predominantly involving the joints of the upper extremities. Musculoskeletal examination of both hands revealed dactylitis and distal interphalangeal joint arthritis. He had a shortened right ring finger with excessive transverse skin folding suggestive of an Opera-Glass hand
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The impact of skin disorders on patients’ quality of life in Malaysia

Published on: 24th January, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7997941944

Background: Skin diseases is a common worldwide problem. It affected every aspect of patients’ quality of life (QOL) mainly physically, socially and psychologically. Objectives: to assess the impact of skin disorders on patients’ quality of life and to identify factors associated with it. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted in outpatient dermatology clinic of a tertiary hospital in Malaysia. A random sample of 145 patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) were interviewed using DLQI questionnaire during their scheduled follow-up appointments at dermatology clinic. Main outcome measure: Self-reported patients’ QOL due to their skin diseases. Results and discussion: Out of three skin diseases psoriasis patients had the highest prevalence (39.3%) followed by AD (34.5%) and acne (26.2%). Patients’ QOL was highly influenced by their skin conditions especially on working/schooling domain. Furthermore, several factors were identified, namely age, working environment, concurrent skin diseases, usage of supplement for skin diseases and type of food as aggravating factors—that may influence patients’ QOL. QOL among females and younger adults was found to be more significantly influenced as compared to males and elderly. With respect to working environment, those who had both indoor and outdoor working environment showed the highest impact of their skin conditions on their QOL. Single patients were more influenced by their skin conditions when compared to those who are married, however it was not significant. Conclusion: Our findings revealed skin disease had negatively impacted individual QOL with different level of aspects. Among the three diseases, AD patients had the worst impact on QOL. Significant predictors of QOL did not relate solely to skin diseases but also other factors such as type of food and working environment.
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Lifestyle Diseases and the Hair Growth Cycle: A multidisciplinary approach using Nourkrin® with Marilex®, a proteoglycan replacement therapy, for anagen induction and maintenance

Published on: 8th December, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317598559

Multiple studies have investigated the relationship between androgenetic alopecia and cardiovascular disease, including studies that have identified elevated rates of cardiovascular disease in patients with vertex hair loss, vertex and frontal hair loss, early onset hair loss and rapidly progressive hair loss. In addition, increased risks for hypertension, excess weight, abnormal lipids, insulin resistance, carotid atheromatosis and death from diabetes or heart disease have been reported in this population. Studies investigating an association between androgenetic alopecia and metabolic syndrome have yielded conflicting findings. Distinct guidelines for the detection and prevention of cardiovascular disease in individuals with androgenetic alopecia have not been established. In addition to the traditional risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease, included in the definition of the metabolic syndrome, several skin diseases have recently been shown to be markers of conditions relating to the patient’s overall health. Physicians should be aware of the possible connection between relatively frequent skin diseases, such as psoriasis and hair growth disruptions, including androgenetic alopecia and female pattern hair loss and cardiovascular disease. This review is concentrated on the association between insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, abdominal fat, cardiovascular disease and hair growth disruptions as an early indicator of these underlying conditions. We have investigated the importance of robust primary clinical treatment measures to address the manifestation of hair loss due to a disruption caused by metabolic syndrome as an effective means to alleviate further stress induced hair loss, which can exacerbate the underlying cause.
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Bee venom: a case of effectiveness on skin varicosities veins with review of its dermatological benefits

Published on: 21st May, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8870468269

Bee venom is a very rich and varied biochemical complex, which explains the multitude of its physiological effects as well as its medical indications. In dermatology, apart from psoriasis, few studies have been conducted concerning its interest and effectiveness; however the preliminary results remain so promising and encouraging. We present a clinical case illustrating the efficacy of bee venom in cutaneous varicosities, with a review of the literature of its main dermatological indications.
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Clinical and epidemiological differences in the course of psoriasis in children depending on Vitamin D levels and genotypes of the TaqI polymorphic variant of the VDR gene

Published on: 7th April, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9018090329

When grouping children with psoriasis depending on TaqI (T/C) genotypes of the VDR gene, the youngest age of disease onset and the longest duration of dermatitis (5.60 ± 0.77 years and 4.90 ± 0.68 years, respectively) showed up in case of the CC genotype. In case of the TT genotype, disease onset coincided with an older age, and the history of present illness was the shortest (10.26 ± 0.64 years and 2.59 ± 0.58 years, respectively). PASI (20.32 ± 3.43) and BSA (40.00 ± 6.11) severity indices were the highest and of statistically significant difference to those in other groups in the presence of the CC genotype. In case of the TC genotype, the index PGA (2.80 ± 0.15) was the lowest and made a statistically significant difference to the values of other groups. A negative correlation between vitamin D levels and the PASI, PGA, BSA was identified in children holding CC and TC genotypes. Conclusion: The clinical presentation of dermatitis and its epidemiological features in children with psoriasis, namely the age of disease onset, duration of exacerbation, body surface area and the intensity of psoriasis symptoms depend on vitamin D serum levels and genotypes of the TaqI polymorphic variant of the VDR gene.
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Drug Eruptions at Patients in Consultation at the Dermatology Department of the Dermatology Teaching Hospital in Bamako, Mali: Epidemiological, Clinical and Etiological Study

Published on: 28th April, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9028058489

The administration of a drug substance is an essential step in the management of a patient. It aims either to cure the patient, to prevent a given disease or sometimes to help with the diagnosis. Unfortunately, the action of the drug can go beyond the desired effect, and cause skin-mucous accidents. These accidents, also known as drug-induced attacks, can be isolated or associated with systemic manifestations [1]. Drug eruption is a real public health issue because of the high frequency. In Europe, drug eruption is responsible for about 20% of spontaneous reports of drug accidents. They complicate 2% to 3% of hospital treatments and motivate 1% of consultations, 5% of hospitalizations in dermatology [2]. Some African authors were interested in the subject. Reported prevalence in hospital settings ranges from 0.4% to 1.53% [3,4]. In Mali, there are no national figures. Old statistics from the Department of Dermatology show that about thirty cases occur each year, most of which are represented by severe forms. However, the risk of drug eruption is thought to be very high due to increased local use of drugs without medical advice, the illegal proliferation of drug outlets (‘Street Medicine’). And the lack of enforcement of existing regulations. In addition, some authors believe that the advent of antiretrovirals and the use of antiInfectious infections used to treat opportunistic infections have increased the risk of Drug eruption by 4 to 30 times, particularly in subjects infected with the acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) [2]. This same risk can be observed in leprosy patients on combination chimotherapy. Clinically, the diagnosis of drug eruption is not as easy as one might think because of clinical polymorphism. The responsibility of a drug for the onset of a reaction is also not easy to establish, as in most cases several drugs are administered simultaneously before the onset of the rash. Because of illiteracy, patients find it difficult to make a complete list of the molecules consumed. To this must be added the high frequency of counterfeit medicines circulating both on the street and in private pharmacies. Given the scarcity of African studies and due to local specificities, it seemed interesting to us to undertake a study on Drug eruption in the dermatology department of the Dermatology teaching hospital of Bamako whose purpose is to study epidemiological aspects, clinical, etiological and to identify the molecules responsible in these patients.
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58-year-old male patient who came to the dermatology service for a clinical picture

Published on: 30th April, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9028060067

58-year-old male patient who came to the dermatology service for a clinical picture consisting of generalized erythematous scaly and pruritic lesions of 2 years of evolution. The clinical judgments provided were: pityriasis versicolor, drop psoriasis, pityriasis rubra pilaris and secondary syphilis (without serology confirming this last hypothesis then). A biopsy of a lesion located on the right costal side was performed. The serology was negative in a second time.
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Follicular psoriasis: a poorly known presentation

Published on: 12th May, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9124807516

Follicular psoriasis is an uncommon diagnosis and probably the least well-known subtype of psoriasis. Hence, we report the clinical and histological findings of follicular psoriasis in one patient to raise awareness of this rare entity.
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The pathogenesis of psoriasis: insight into a complex “Mobius Loop” regulation process

Published on: 22nd October, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9322473772

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex mechanism, which is believed to be mainly based on immune disorders and activation of inflammatory pathways. However, we have combed through the literature and found that the pathogenesis of psoriasis might involve a “mobius loop” of “immunity-inflammation-oxidative stress-proliferation” process. The disordered immune environment of the skin might act as the basis, the outbreak of inflammatory factors as the mediator, and the imbalance of oxidative stress homeostasis as the activator. These factors work together, leading to abnormal proliferation of keratinocytes and further immune abnormalities, finally aggravating psoriasis. Therefore, here we review the latest evidence and advance in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, trying to contribute to further understanding and treatment of psoriasis.
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