Siblings

Anxiety and depression as an effect of birth order or being an only child: Results of an internet survey in Poland and Germany

Published on: 14th September, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317595908

Background: Various studies examined the effect of birth order. First born children show usually better cognitive performance than their later born siblings. Studies on emotional aspects yield heterogeneous results, sometimes in favour of first born, sometimes in favour of later born children. Studies comparing only-children with children with siblings are rare. Method: An internet survey was performed in 508 Polish and 500 German subjects. Only-children, first born, middle born and latest born children were compared regarding body mass index, depression, anxiety and partnership. Results: No differences among first born, middle born and latest born children were detected. Only-children reported significantly less symptoms of social phobia than first born children (z=0.50, p< 0.01). Conclusions: Except for suicidality, the results of this study question the sense of further investment in studying effects of birth order. In contrast, examining differences between only-children vs. children having siblings seems to have the potential to yield interesting and new results. Optimally, such research would combine self-report measures with reports from others, such as parents, teachers or clinicians.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Enclosure asphyxia as a cause of death in 3 Nigerian children trapped at the boot of car-Case reports and review of literature

Published on: 11th October, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286353355

The paper reviews enclosure asphyxia as a cause of death of three Nigerian children aged three years, five years and seven years respectively, who were found dead and locked in the boot of a Mercedes Benz 200E Sedan car a day after they were declared missing. The first two were siblings of the same parent whose fathers actually owned the car, while the older child was a neighbour kid all of whom were well known to each other as friends and playmates. They had gone missing for a few hours prior to being seen playing together. Search parties were raised and they were never found until the following day when they were found dead in the boot of the car parked a few meters away from the house under a tree. Incidentally the same car was driven round the neighbourhood for 3 hours during the search the previous day with no inkling that they were in the boot of the car. Autopsy was ordered by the coroner to determine the cause of death.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

A rare cause of neonatal diarrhoea: Microvillositary inclusion disease: about a case report

Published on: 20th May, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9137583742

Microvillositary inclusion disease also known as microvillositary atrophy is a rare congenital enteropathy containing a border abnormality in the brushes of enterocytes, manifesting as severe rebellious diarrhea in newborns and infants. It was first described in 1978 by Davidson, et al. The autosomal recessive mode of transmission is suggested because of the frequency of familial cases and inbreeding. Histopathology plays an essential role in establishing the diagnosis. In 2008, a common mutation was identified in most of the patients studied in the MYO5B gene that codes for the Myosin Vb protein, which helped in understanding the etiopathogeny of this pathology poorly described in the literature. The prognosis for this pathology is extremely bleak, requiring total parenteral nutrition for child survival. Intestinal transplantation is for the moment the only long-term solution. Materials and methods: We report the case of an infant aged 6 months, with no perinatal antecedent. There is 1st degree consanguinity, the mother has a history of deaths in younger siblings in undetermined circumstances. Who since the age of 3 days presents profuse liquid diarrhoea with malnutrition, dehydration and enormous abdominal distension? Several diagnoses were suspected before the jejune biopsy was carried out, which led to the diagnosis of a microvilliositary inclusion disease. The aim of our work is to highlight the rarest cause of neonatal rebel diarrhoea and to know how to include it among other differential diagnoses.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Endocrine abnormalities in two siblings with Rothmund Thomson Syndrome

Published on: 11th October, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7906107605

Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by poikiloderma (skin atrophy, telangiectasia, hyper- and hypopigmentation), congenital skeletal abnormalities, short stature, premature aging, and increased risk of malignant disease. Two siblings with Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome showed the following characteristic features: severe growth failure, dystrophic nails, absent eyelashes/eyebrows, small hands, clinodactyly, microdontia and congential poikiloderma. In addition, delayed sexual development with cryptorchidism in the male and Hashimato thyroiditis in the female patient were detected. These cases are presented here because of these endocrine patterns, with the aim of drawing attention to the invisible aspects of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Needs in siblings of individuals with Down Syndrome and levels of coping Cali, Colombia

Published on: 1st November, 2021

Objective: To determine the needs and level of coping in siblings of people with Down Syndrome. Methods: Descriptive, cross-sectional study, carried out in 2016. Sample consisted of 30 siblings of people with Down Syndrome between 6 and 60 years old. Using non-probability convenience sampling. Two instruments were used to collect the information: a) a validated sociodemographic and needs survey of the siblings, designed by the authors, and b). Callista Roy adaptation and coping survey validated. Results: 60% of the siblings report not having felt judged by other people when presenting their brother/sister with Down syndrome. 73.3% of the siblings did not receive information about Down Syndrome from a nursing professional, the need to strengthen the nursing care provided to the siblings of people with disabilities in this regard is evident. 53.3% of these present a medium level of coping with respect to the condition of having a brother with Down syndrome. Conclusion: Identified needs were: time needs, affective needs, family needs, social needs, economic and access to information needs. Highlighting these needs allows the nursing professional to identify and consider the siblings of people with Down Syndrome have different needs than the rest of the family nucleus. Where interventions aimed at reducing the harmful effects and enhancing those characteristics of gain related with having a brother with Down Syndrome.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat