ketogenic

Beneficial effects of a ketogenic diet in a woman with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Published on: 15th November, 2022

Objective: To evaluate the effects on quality of life and body composition of a Ketogenic Diet (KD) in a woman with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Methods: Physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) health conditions were evaluated with the SF-36 questionnaire; dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to determine body composition; parameters were determined at baseline and after 12 weeks of KD.Results: At baseline PCS and MCS were 20.6 and 20.7 respectively with 37.9% fat mass. After 12 weeks SF-36 values significantly improved: PCS 55 and MCS 66.1 with 33.9% fat mass. Conclusion: KD improved the patient’s quality of life and decreased fat mass. Further studies will be needed to better elucidate the beneficial effects of KD among people with CMT.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

The Ketogenic Diet: The Ke(y) - to Success? A Review of Weight Loss, Lipids, and Cardiovascular Risk

Published on: 6th March, 2024

Background: Obesity remains a global epidemic with over 2.8 million people dying due to complications of being overweight or obese every year. The low-carbohydrate and high-fat ketogenic diet has a rising popularity for its rapid weight loss potential. However, most studies have a maximal 2-year follow-up, and therefore long-term adverse events remain unclear including the risk of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease (ASCVD).Results: Based on current evidence on PubMed and Google Scholar, there is no strong indication ketogenic diet is advantageous for weight loss, lipid profile, and mortality. When comparing a hypocaloric ketogenic diet with a low-fat diet, there may be faster weight loss until 6 months, however, this then appears equivalent. Ketogenic diets have shown inconsistent Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) changes; perhaps from different saturated fat intake, dietary adherence, and genetics. Case reports have shown a 2-4-fold elevation in LDL in Familial hypercholesterolaemic patients which has mostly reversed upon dietary discontinuation. There is also concern about possible increased ASCVD and mortality: low (< 40%) carbohydrate intake has been associated with increased mortality, high LDL from saturated fats, high animal product consumption can increase trimethylamine N-oxide, and cardioprotective foods are likely minimally ingested.Conclusion: Ketogenic diets have been associated with short-term positive effects including larger weight reductions. However, by 2 years there appears no significant differences for most cardiometabolic risk markers. Therefore, this raises the question, excluding those who have a critical need to lose weight fast, is this diet worth the potentially higher risks of ASCVD and mortality while further long-term studies are awaited?
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

A-Z Journals

Help ?

HSPI: We're glad you're here. Please click "create a new Query" if you are a new visitor to our website and need further information from us.

If you are already a member of our network and need to keep track of any developments regarding a question you have already submitted, click "take me to my Query."