Hemangioma

Extremely large hemangioma of the liver: Safety of the expectant management

Published on: 6th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8257068015

Hemangiomas are known as congenital vascular malformations that can affect almost any organ or tissue, with the liver being the most common intra-abdominal organ to be involved. It is well known that hemangiomas are the most common benign tumours of the liver, and develop in about 4-20% of people, mainly young adult females. Recently, due to the dramatic rise in the use of imaging studies for different purposes, a parallel increase in the incidence of these tumours has been noticed. Most liver hemangiomas are small (less than 4cm in diameter), asymptomatic and found incidentally during abdominal operation for other indication or on radiologic studies. Giant liver hemangioma is defined as hemangioma with a diameter of more than 5cm. This unique and uncommon type of haemangioma usually poses therapeutic challenges for the treating physician, especially hepatic surgeons, due to the unclear natural history, and due to the risk of life threatening complications is yet to be established. While it is already proved by several studies that conservative management of giant hepatic hemangioma is safe, it is not known whether observation of the extremely large hepatic hemangioma (tumours larger than 10cm) is safe as well. The aim of this article is to review the English literature to find out if conservative management of the extremely giant liver hemangioma is safe and can be recommended.
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Recent advances in pathophysiology and management of subglottic Hemangioma

Published on: 4th May, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7814923433

Subglottic hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor of the larynx of pediatrics; in contrast, it is relatively uncommon, accounting for an estimated 1.5% of congenital laryngeal anomalies [1].
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Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma associated with Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome

Published on: 17th May, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9272395700

Background: Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH) is a rare vascular tumor that is present at birth and involutes during the first year of life. Kasabach-Merritt syndrome (KMS) is a complication of some vascular tumors such as kaposiform hemangioendothelioma and tufted angioma associated with thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Results: The case of a 2-month-old infant with a diagnosis of RICH with thrombocytopenia and coagulation disorder, successfully treated with surgical excision without complications or recurrence is presented. Conclusion: The association between RICH and KMS is rare. Histopathological study, immunohistochemistry and ultrasound findings are important for the diagnosis. Brief summary: This report covers the rare association between rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma and Kasabach-Merritt syndrome in a 2-months-old female infant.
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Periocular capillary hemangioma treated with low dose oral propranolol - presentation and outcome of 30 patients

Published on: 31st December, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9382537723

Purpose: To evaluate the presentation and outcome of periocular capillary hemangioma treated with low-dose oral propranolol.Method: Thirty cases of periocular capillary hemangioma prospectively studied from 1st June 2015 to 31st May 2017 who received oral propranolol on an outpatient basis. Hemangioma causing any threat to vision or disfigurement was included and age below 3 months and multiple lesions were excluded. Starting dose of propranolol was 1 mg/kg and increased to 2 mg/kg after 2 weeks as a maintenance dose. The tapering dose was 1 mg/kg of body weight before discontinuing the medication. Treatment was continued till the child is 1 year of age or no further change in color or size of the lesion in two successive follow-ups. Results: Presenting age was 6.36 ± 3.36 months (ranged 3–24 months) with female predominance (70%). In 86.6% of cases, the vision was Central Steady and Maintained and cycloplegic refraction showed marked astigmatism in 3 children which resolved after treatment. Forty-six percent of children showed color change as an initial response to treatment. Most children (33.3%) responded completely within 5 months after starting the treatment. One third patients (33.3%) showed 100% resolution, 50% showed 90% to 70% resolution. Pretreatment and post-treatment lesion size was1.60 ± 0.86 cm2 and 0.30 ± 0.40 cm2 respectively (p - value < 0.0005). None showed any significant adverse effect of oral propranolol.Conclusion: Low-dose oral propranolol is an effective and cost-effective treatment modality for periocular capillary hemangioma and is safe as an outpatient basis. 
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