Articles

Concentration Polarization of Ox-LDL and Its Effect on Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human Endothelial Cells

Published on: 30th December, 2016

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286351432

Background: Flow-dependent concentration polarization of native LDL is important in the localization of atherogenesis. However, ox-LDL plays a more important role than n-LDL in atherogenesis by inducing cell proliferation and apoptosis. We hypothesized that concentration polarization of ox-LDL may adversely affect vascular beds due to its toxicity to endothelial cell (EC) lining. Methods: Using a parallel-plate flow chamber technique, we studied water filtration rate and wall concentration of ox-LDLs EC monolayers cultured on permeable or non-permeable membranes. ECs cultured on permeable and non-permeable membranes were examined in terms of cell viability, ox-LDL uptake, LOX-1 expression and cell apoptosis (Cytochrome c and Bcl-2 expression). We observed that the wall concentration of ox-LDL was about 16% higher in the permeable group than in the permeable group (P<0.05). Cell proliferation (MTT assay) increased in response to low concentration of ox-LDL (1-5 μg/ml), and fell drastically in response to higher concentration; all these changes were more pronounced in the permeable group than in the non-permeable group. The uptake of ox-LDL and LOX-1 expression by ECs were also significantly higher in the permeable group than in the non-permeable group of cultured cells. Conclusions: These observations suggest that concentration polarization of ox-LDL occurs in an artery that is permeable to water, and ox-LDL concentration polarization can enhance ox-LDL accumulation into the arterial wall and accelerate EC proliferation at low concentrations and apoptosis at high concentrations, possibly via LOX-1 expression.
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Mid-Ventricular Ballooning in Atherosclerotic and Non-Atherosclerotic Abnormalities of the Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery

Published on: 30th December, 2016

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286428119

In a series of meanwhile 10 cases rigid straightening of the mid-portion of the left anterior descending coronary artery without lumen reduction mid-ventricular or basal ballooning was reported, or both basal and mid-ventricular ballooning in one case. In all these patients wrap-around (recurrent segment) phenomenon of the left anterior descending coronary artery was not present. The abnormalities of the left anterior descending coronary artery are due to myocardial bridging without lumen reduction of the LAD, only seen in computed tomography. When stress or in some cases happiness appears myocardial ballooning can appear, lasts 2-4 weeks and disappear with a recurrence rate of nearly 10% despite beta blocking agents.
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Left Atrial Remodeling is Associated with Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with Reperfused Acute Myocardial Infarction

Published on: 7th December, 2016

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286353354

Background: Left atrial volume (LAV) has been established as a sensitive marker of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function and as an independent predictor of mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). LA remodeling and its determinants in the setting of AMI have not been much studied. Methods: We studied 53 patients with anterior AMI and a relatively preserved LV systolic function, who underwent complete reperfusion and received guidelines guided antiremodeling drug management. LA and LV remodeling were assessed using 2D echocardiography at baseline and 6 months. LAV indexed for BSA (LAVi) was used as the index of LA size and further LA remodeling. Results: LAVi increased signifi cantly at 6 months compared to baseline [28.1 (23.0-34.5) vs 24.4 (19.5- 31.6) ml/m2, p=0.002] following LV end diastolic-volume index change [56.8 (47.6-63.9) vs 49.5 (42.0-58.4) ml/m2, p=0.0003]. Other standard LV diastolic function indices did not show any signifi cant change. Univariateanalysis showed a strong positive correlation of LAVi change with BNP levels at discharge, LV mass index and LV volumes indices change, throughout the follow up period. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that BNP plasma levels was the most important independent predictor of LA remodeling (b-coef.=0.630, p=0.001). Conclusions: Despite current antiremodeling strategies in patients with AMI, LA remodeling is frequently asssociated with LV remodeling. Additionally LAVi change in the mid-term reflects better than standard echocardiographic indices LV diastolic filling impairment.
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Parents Take-On Concussion: Advances in Sideline Research and Culture in Youth Sports

Published on: 16th March, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286354252

Identifying concussion and initiating removal from play is challenging for even the most diligent youth sports organizations. Empowering parents to implement removal from play protocols and sideline testing may be the most practical plan at community levels to protect young athletes. We developed paradigms for community-based youth sports teams that incorporated both standard concussion protocols and research investigations. The research studies were designed to determine how sideline tests of vision, cognition and balance augment the capacity for parents and other responsible adults to identify youth athletes with concussion in ice hockey, football, lacrosse and cheerleading. Research-based sideline tests were performed at pre-season baseline sessions and during the season at the time of injury or as soon as symptoms were recognized by trained volunteer parent team testers. The combination of standard concussion protocols and research studies were performed for 510 athletes, aged 5-17 years, over 2.5 years through 5 athletic seasons. To implement the protocols and studies, approximately 80 student volunteers and parents were educated and trained on early concussion recognition and on baseline and sideline test administration. Over 80% of parent-identified head injuries were physician-confirmed concussions. Of the sideline tests performed, over two-thirds were administered within 24 hours of injury; the rest were performed within an average of 2.6 days post-injury since some athletes had delayed development of symptoms. Removal from play guidelines and standard concussion evaluation protocols were maintained in the context of the sideline testing research investigations. Based on this observational study, parents of youth athletes can be successfully empowered to perform rapid sideline tests in the context of existing concussion protocols. Implementation of objective testing may improve concussion identification and shift the culture of advocacy and responsibility towards parent groups to promote safety of young athletes. Ongoing investigations will further examine the impact of these programs on concussion management in youth sports.
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The effect of a European-based exercise program upon the health-related physical fitness of individuals with intellectual disabilities: The alive and kicking perspective

Published on: 24th December, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8505524065

The present study examined the effect of the European-Based ‘Alive and Kicking’ exercise program on the health-related physical fitness of individuals with (Experimental Group: EG) and without (Control Group: CG) (Intellectual Disability: ID). The Self-Determination Theory: SDT, guided both the 6-month preparatory phase and the 9-month exercise program, which was conducted in five separate European countries (Cyprus, France, Greece, Portugal and Spain). The total sample (n = 200, 54% males and 46% females) comprised of 168 individuals with ID (age: 26.54 years, + 7.78) and 32 individuals without ID (age: 25.81 years, + 8.73) respectively. The statistical analyses revealed that the ID group’s performance (EG) improved significantly in a range of health-related physical fitness variables (sit & reach, pushups, sit ups, long jump, ½ mile walk/ run). In turn, the participants from the CG improved mainly in muscular endurance (sit ups and pushups). The results are discussed in accordance with SDT and the dairies kept from the staff involved (coaches and psychologists) during the 9–month intervention. The present findings, although subjective to certain limitations, are encouraging, given the large-scale, real-world nature of the research design, and provide evidence supporting the integration of theoretical strategies enhancing motivation into traditional coaching programs for individuals with ID.
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Anthropometric characteristics and somatotype of professional soccer players by position

Published on: 1st November, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8304643029

The anthropometric characteristics are decisive for an optimal physical level and, therefore, a good level in the game; and they can be different depending on the game position. The aim of this study was to identify the physical characteristics, body composition and somatotype of professional soccer players and to verify differences according to their playing positions: goalkeepers, defenders, forwards and midfielders. The measurements were performed on 57 male players of a soccer team of the Spanish Football League One. Twenty seven anthropometric variables were measured (height and body weight, four bone breadths, eleven girths and ten skinfolds) and the Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis was also performed. The percentage of body fat has been determined from 11 different equations. Goalkeepers showed the highest weight (80.2 ± 3.2 kg), supraespinal (10.5 ± 3.8 mm) and abdominal (15.6 ± 3.5 mm) skinfolds than others positions. In relation to body fat percentages, similar results were obtained from the equations of Jackson-Pollock (from 3 and 7 skinfolds), Carter, Withers, and Heyward and Stolarczyk (mean value 7.8 ± 1.5%). Higher results were obtained from the other equations applied. Differences among positions were also found concerning body composition; goalkeepers showed the highest body fat percentage (9.4 ± 1.4%). Mean somatotype was also different among positions; goalkeepers and forwards presented a balanced mesomorph somatotype while defenders and midfielders showed an ecto-mesomorph one. The differences in morphological characteristics according to the team position were notice only in goalkeepers, especially regarding their weight, abdominal and supraespinale skinfolds and the percentage of fat tissue.
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Comparison of selected lower limb biomechanical variables between university of ibadan sportsmen with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome

Published on: 16th August, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8235051929

Patellofemoral pain syndrome is common among athletes who participate in jumping, running and pivoting sports. The aim of this study was to compare selected lower limb biomechanical variables between University of Ibadan students (athletes) with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome. The research design for this study was a case control survey and a purposive sampling technique was used to recruit participants. Two hundred and twenty two (191(85.8%) males and 31 (14.2%) females) sportsmen participated in this study. The participants’ age was between 20-29 years. Fourty sportsmen tested positive to Clarke’s test while 27 sportsmen tested positive to Eccentric step test. Measurements of static quadriceps angle, hamstring tightness and navicular height were taken for all participants. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics of mean, standard deviation, percentages and inferential statistics of Independent ‘t’ test. The mean lower limb biomechanical variables of participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome were 13.18 ± 2.37°, 106.46 ± 16.11° and 1.21 ± 0.61 cm while those without were 13.65 ± 2.46°, 128.95 ± 25.36° and 1.03 ± 0.58 cm for static quadriceps angle, hamstring tightness and navicular height respectively. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in selected lower limb biomechanical variables between participants with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome. In conclusion there was no significant difference in static quadriceps angle, hamstring tightness and ankle pronation between participants with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome. It was recommended that PFPS development is probably multifactorial with other functional disorders of the lower extremity apart from the selected variables.
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Assessment of shoulder pain and somatic dysfunction in young competitive swimmers: Preventive Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment

Published on: 9th August, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8212828091

Context: Shoulder pain is one of the most frequent reported complaints in intensive competitive swimming. The so-called ‘swimmers’ shoulder’ has been widely explored and has been reported sometimes without specific reference to contributing mechanisms or structures. Somatic dysfunction is defined as an impaired or altered function of related components of the somatic system and may appear in the early stage of pain feeling. Aim: To evaluate somatic dysfunctions in a group of young competitive swimmers with and without shoulder pain and its relationship with the shoulder’s mobility along with the efficacy of an osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on shoulder’s mobility, pain, and comfort of swimming. Material and method: 20 competitive swimmers (14.6 ± 1.3 ys; 11.6 ± 2.4 hs.wk-1) were divided into two groups, with and without shoulder pain (SPG/CG). Before and after light touch/OMT, and 1 week later, somatic dysfunctions, shoulder’s range of mobility, pain, and swimming comfort were assessed by 2 independent osteopaths. Results: Somatic dysfunctions were observed in both groups without significant differences in the number or localization and were independent of severity of pain. In the SPG, pain decreased significantly after OMT (6.1 ± 1.9 vs. 3.9 ± 1.8; p = 0.001) and remained stable 1-week later (P = NS). Shoulder’s mobility was lower on the aching shoulder in the “shoulder pain” group when compared to the control group on flexion and abduction tests but not on extension or adduction tests. Following OMT, only abduction improved when compared to light touch. Comfort in swimming was reported as “better” in both OMT/light touch groups. Conclusion: There is no difference between light touch and OMT as both decreased pain and increased comfort in swimming but abduction range of motion only improved in the OMT group.
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Analysis of the characteristics of chinese traditional sports culture in the new period

Published on: 23rd July, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8192136507

Through cultural consciousness, the characteristics of traditional Chinese sports culture in the new period are analyzed and studied, and the traditional Chinese sports culture in the new period has the following six characteristics: 1. Sports social model of “etiquette” 2. Sports personality model of the gentleman’s way; 3. The sports behavior mode of the golden mean; 4. The social nature of sports of socialism with Chinese characteristics; 5. Sports cultural nature of emotional culture; 6 limited competitive sports competition.
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The effects of physiotherapy and rehabilitation on Pallister-Killian Syndrome: A case report

Published on: 20th December, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7964755732

The aim of the paper is to determine the effects of physiotherapy and rehabilitation (PHTR) on a child with Pallister-Killian Syndrome (PKS). Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and duration of grasping ping pong ball were the primary outcome measures which were conducted at the beginning, 12th, and 24th month. Neurodevelopmental Therapy and Sensory Integration Therapy were used as intervention methods. The most increase with around 50% was acquired in Section A of the GMFM. Duration of holding a ping pong ball gradually increased. As a result, this is the first paper presenting a PHTR shedule and its results in a child with PKS.
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